The Rooster Crows – Feb. 3, 2023

By Bill Anderson

Button up that overcoat! Baby, it’s cold outside. Saturday, Sunday & Monday, January 28 through the 30th, showed North Dakota what winter could be like if it wasn’t for global warming. Sub-zero temperatures for daily highs, and sub-sub-zero double digit low temperatures for each morning. Monday morning, January 30, had the lowest thermometer reading at -24. It might have been colder, but the thermometer didn’t go any lower than that. Starting with Tuesday, January 31, the daily high peaked above the Zero mark, even though the morning low stood at 10 below. It’s still going to be cold on Ground Hog’s Day, Thursday, February 2, but by this weekend the weather gurus are predicting a warmup, all the way into the mid-30’s by Saturday, February 4. 

January’s cold didn’t stop local residents from enjoying some arctic fun. More than fifty snowmobiles and approximately 100 riders, passengers and 4-WD pickup drivers stopped at The Lariat Bar in Rutland on the evening of Saturday, January 21. The event was a Poker Run, and Rutland was the last stop. The trip had begun in Wyndmere, then went west, through Delamere, Milnor and Gwinner, then south to Forman, and then east to Rutland. Just for fun, some riders continued east to Cayuga, Geneseo and Lidgerwood, before arriving back at Wyndmere. They had the staff at the Lariat hustling for drinks & food, and a good time was enjoyed by all.

Hal Nelson, a die-hard Minnesota Twins baseball fan, drove to Minneapolis on Friday, January 27, with the intention of attending the Twins’ mid-winter “Meet The Team” event on Saturday, January 28. Unfortunately for Hal, his brother-in-law, Alan Wilke, who had planned to accompany him, fell ill on Saturday morning, and Hal decided to forego exposing the Twins 2023 lineup to whatever illness had felled Alan. Hal must have been immune to the bug that ailed Alan because he didn’t get it.  Despite not getting to meet the Twins’ lineup, Hal said that he still had a good weekend visiting with his sisters, Becky Wilke & Tammy Tipton, and their families. Hal said that the Twins apparently did not miss him, as he did not receive any calls or text messages from the Twin’s Front Office inquiring about his absence. Hal usually purchases an autographed team baseball at the mid-winter event, but so far at least, the spot reserved for the 2023 ball on his display shelf is still vacant.

Continue reading “The Rooster Crows – Feb. 3, 2023”

The Rooster Crows – Jan. 27, 2023

By Bill Anderson

January, which has been content to let December claim the credit for most of this Winter’s ferocious weather, has decided to lower the hammer on the final weekend of the month. Predicted highs for this coming weekend, beginning on Saturday, January 28, are all below Zero, and the predicted lows, of course, are even lower. This siege of arctic cold is expected to last until Ground Hog’s Day on Thursday, February 2, maybe longer, depending on the mood of the Ground Hog, Rutland Roscoe, a cousin of Punxsutawney Phil. Anyway, we live in North Dakota, and we cannot expect to escape Winter’s wrath indefinitely. We can consider ourselves fortunate that it has held off as long as it has. We are lucky that we have not had to endure some of the winter weather encountered by our pioneer ancestors back in the 1880’s and 1890’s. John Bloomdale, one of Rutland’s original residents, recounted that in the terrible Winter of 1895-96, or maybe it was 1896-97, he was living in a small, tarpaper covered shack located toward the east end of the rail yard, near the old Great Northern stockyard which stood on the south side of the siding, just north of where Calvin & Wendy Jacobson’s home is now situated. According to Mr. Bloomdale, the cold that winter was intense. He said that on one occasion he had made a kettle of soup and set it just outside the door to cool. The soup froze instantaneously, he said, so fast, in fact, that when he pulled the frozen kettle of soup back into his shack, the ice was still hot to the touch. There was a tremendous amount of snow that Winter, and by Christmas it had completely covered his tiny home, threatening to cover the chimney and cut off the draft for his stove. Bloomdale said that he went to the hardware store and bought another 3 foot length of stovepipe to extend the height of his chimney. The snow kept coming, though, and he had to extend his chimney several more times. When the snow finally melted that Spring, he discovered that he had 18 three foot lengths of stovepipe towering above his shack. Another phenomenon Mr. Bloomdale described was the effect of the extreme cold on the railroad locomotives’ steam whistles. When the locomotives approached the yard limit, on arrival and on departure, they blew their whistles, but the cold was so extreme that the steam froze before it could do anything, even make a squeak, and the frozen lump of steam would fall silently to the ground. When all those frozen steam whistles thawed out simultaneously on the first warm day, Bloomdale stated, the racket was deafening. Some of the steam whistles, he said, were buried under big snowbanks on the shady side of the track, and they kept on thawing out, surprising folks with a whistle blast from a long departed locomotive until early Summer. Well, it was Mr. Bloomdale’s story, and, as the late Ray Erickson often pointed out, he could tell it the way he wanted. If anyone who was around back then wants to dispute his account, let them step forward and be heard. He was there, and we weren’t.

Sonja (Anderson) Christensen, one of the organizers of the 27th Annual Rudy Anderson Memorial Pinochle Tournament, recently posted the information that, as of Monday, January 23, 43 teams have now pre-registered for the event. The tournament will be held on Saturday, February 4, in the Rutland Town Hall. The Rutland Community Club will be serving morning and afternoon lunch to tournament participants, as well as a Noon repast featuring Rutland’s scalloped potatoes with ham, made with real potatoes, real ham and real cream. Any pinochle enthusiast interested in signing up to participate in the best run pinochle tournament in the region, or in obtaining more information about the tourney, should contact Sonja at cschristensen@midco.net, or call her at 701-899-1463 or 701-642-6793. 

Continue reading “The Rooster Crows – Jan. 27, 2023”

The Rooster Crows – Jan. 20, 2023

By Bill Anderson

The January Thaw, if it was a January thaw, was brief, but welcome. On Sunday, January 15, the mercury clawed its way above the freezing mark for the first time in 2023. Some thermometers even registered temperatures as high as 35 above for a couple of hours. According to Dennis McLaen, a UFO report was about to be made on the bright, shining object that appeared in the sky on Sunday afternoon, before someone figured out that it was the Sun, making its first appearance in several days. Dennis and his grandchildren took advantage of the beautiful sunny day to go sledding in the hills south of Rutland, just west of the Jesse & Bobbi Jo Maly farmstead. The short reprieve from January didn’t last long, though, as the temperature was below freezing all day on Monday, the 16th, and the northwest wind blew in another 4 to 6 inches of new snow. On the bright side, according to the local TV weathermen, there is more snow and cold weather in the forecast for the remainder of January. Just what we wanted.

Chuck Anderson was checking weather reporting web sites on his cell phone during the morning coffee session at the Rutland Seniors’ Center on Wednesday, January 18, and came across the North Dakota Agriculture Weather Network (NDAWN) web site. NDAWN has reporting stations across the upper Great Plains, from Montana to Minnesota. There is a monitoring site at the Kelly Cooper farm, near Brampton. According to NDAWN, the thick snow cover that has blanketed this area since mid-November has insulated the soil, and prevented the frost from going very deep. According to the NDAWN statistics, the frost depth in Sargent County ranges from 0 to 12 inches, not very deep for a winter that has been consistently cold for 2½ months. The good news from this information is that the frost is not likely to prevent the snowmelt from being absorbed by the soil when the snow finally melts in March, April or May. With a little bit of luck there will be enough soil moisture to get a crop started this spring, despite last year’s drought conditions. So, even though shoveling snow is a pain in the neck, in the back, or somewhere else on the anatomy, snow is good for something, once in a while.

The best laid plans of mice, men and fishermen sometimes go awry. That was the experience of Cameron Gulleson and Darren Ptacek when they accompanied two representatives from Peterson Farms Seeds on an ice fishing expedition to Lake Of The Woods during the second weekend in January. Cameron reports that they had no sooner arrived at the resort where their expedition was headquartering than Darren came down with the nasty variety of influenza that has been plaguing this area. Six hours later, Cameron was afflicted with the same ailment, and shortly thereafter the2 seed reps were also laid low. All four were aching, wheezing, sneezing, hacking & coughing in unison. It was not the type of fishing trip they were expecting, Cameron said. After suffering in their cabin for a few days, they finally crawled out and drove home on Tuesday, January 10, still suffering the symptoms of fever, congestion, aches, pains and exhaustion. As of Tuesday, January 17, Cameron reports that he is back in the land of the living, although he still occasionally feels some of the effects of the illness. Once a person has acquired this particular brand of influenza, they can expect that it will take a month, or more, to fully recover from its effects. The Rutland community extends best wishes to Cameron, Darren and their friends for a speedy and complete recovery.

Continue reading “The Rooster Crows – Jan. 20, 2023”

The Rooster Crows – Jan. 13, 2023

By Bill Anderson

The Rooster Crows is back, for a while, anyway.  Life throws us a curve ball once in a while, and you never know when the Umpire is going to shout “You’re Out!” as the ball hits the catcher’s mitt. This past Christmas the weather gods blessed Rutland and vicinity with ferocious blizzards, arctic temperatures and multiple feet of snow. The only time that the weather wasn’t atrocious was when it was worse. Additionally, an epidemic of respiratory infections, influenza and, more than likely, some kind of covid-19 variant swept through the community like the Grim Reaper on steroids, bestowing generous supplies of wheezing, sneezing, aches & pains upon the populace. Fortunately, most around here have had their vaccinations & boosters, so the infections were not fatal, although some victims feared that they might die, and others were afraid that they might not. When the door slammed on 2022 it was “good riddance to bad rubbish,” and no one was sorry to see the old year leave.  Its replacement, 2023, has been calm and peaceful by comparison thus far, but that’s a situation likely to change, too. As of Friday, January 13, it is only 66 days until the Vernal Equinox, the First Day of Spring in the northern hemisphere, and we can do that standing on our heads. Until then, keep your overshoes on, your cap pulled down, your collar turned up and your stick on the ice. 

The Rutland City Council met at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, January 9, in the Rutland Town Hall with City Auditor Deb Banish; City Council President Rodney Erickson; and Council members Lori McLaen; Delores Lysne; and, Bill Anderson; present.  Mayor Mike Mahrer was absent. Council President Erickson conducted the meeting until Mayor Mahrer arrived.  The financial report showed all funds to be in the black. The Auditor reported that the City has acquired the tax forfeited property identified as Lots 1 & 2 of Block 5, Original Addition from Sargent County. Some prior owners of this property include: Mr. & Mrs. Charles Weller; Mr. & Mrs. Alvin Weller; Andrew & Esther Sundlie; Jeff & Katy Kulzer; and, Brad & Rebecca Christensen. The property will be put up for sale on bids later this year. The Council approved an increase in the garbage collection fee of $5.00 per container, and an increase in the sewer fee of $1.00 per household. The Auditor mentioned that the City had not increased garbage & sewer fees since 2005, despite the fact that costs of operation had increased by about 53%, due to inflation, since then. Mayor Mahrer arrived at the meeting in time to conduct the vote. The sidewalk replacement project on the east side of Main Street will be discussed with the City Engineer at the March Council meeting. After reviewing the City’s bills, the Council authorized payment and adjourned.  The next meeting of the Rutland City Council is scheduled for 5:00 p.m. on Monday, February 6, at the Rutland Town Hall. All meetings of the Rutland City Council are open to the public, and Rutland residents are invited to stop in to observe their city government in action. 

The Rutland Community Club met at 6:00 p.m. on Monday, January 9, at the Rutland Town Hall, following the Rutland City Council meeting. President Katie McLaen reported that club members reviewed the annual Santa Claus Day event that had been held at the Town Hall on Saturday, December 17, and concluded “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.” Santa Claus will be invited to make his 78th annual pre-Christmas visit to Rutland in December of 2023, so, he’s coming back, and you had better be good! The next Community Club sponsored event will be the 27th Annual Rudy Anderson Memorial Pinochle Tournament on Saturday, February 4, in the Rutland Town Hall. The Community Club is once again planning to serve the scalloped potatoes with ham dinner to tournament participants. Anyone wishing to help out should contact Katie at 701-680-9354. The next Community Club event after the Pinochle Tourney will be the annual Fun Night & Carnival on Sunday, March 26, at the Rutland Town Hall. Club members also discussed a plan to acquire some additional aluminum bleachers for use at Lou Sanderson Field. Uff-Da Day revenues will be used to make  the purchase. The next monthly meeting of the Rutland Community Club is scheduled for 5:00 p.m. on Monday, February 13, at the Rutland Town Hall. Everyone is invited.

Rutland native Sonja (Anderson) Christensen, a daughter of the Late Rudy & Edna Anderson of this community, and one of the organizers of the upcoming 27th Annual Rudy Anderson Memorial Pinochle Tournament that will be held in the Rutland Town Hall on Saturday, February 4, reports that, as of Sunday, January 8, 24 teams had already pre-registered to participate in the tourney. One of the teams includes a 93 year old Dad who resides in Minnesota, and his son who makes his home in Seattle WA.  Sonja states that 2 locals: Roger McLaen; and, Stella Bell; have participated in all 26 prior tournaments, and she expects to see them at the 27th, too. A couple from Forman, Roger & Bonita Ziegler, have played in all but one of the preceding 26 tournaments.  Sonja says that anyone who wants to register for the tournament should call her at 701-899-1463 or 701-642-6793, or send an e-mail to cschristensen@midco.net.  Sonja states that she is looking forward to greeting many old friends, and making some new ones, at the 27th Annual Rudy Anderson Memorial Pinochle Tournament on Saturday, February 4, at the Rutland Town Hall.

Morning coffee hour participants with January birthdays were honored with a chorus of the “Happy Birthday” song and a big slice of birthday cake on the morning of Monday, January 9, at the Rutland Seniors’ Center. Among those with January birthdays were: Ann Erickson; Hal Nelson; and, Bill Anderson. Those not present included: Andy Harris; Pam Maloney; Rick Banish; and, Boyd Jacobson Jr.  Happy Birthday all!

Randy McGinnity of RPM Sound Design of Wheatland ND was in Rutland this week, installing new audio-video-streaming equipment at Nordland Lutheran Church. The new equipment is expected to improve sound quality in the Church Sanctuary and Fellowship Hall, and to enhance the worship experience for those tuning in to Nordland’s on-line ministry.

Some upcoming events in Rutland include: Nordland Lutheran Church Annual meeting at 10:30 a.m. on Sunday, January 22, at the Church building in Rutland; 27th Annual Rudy Anderson Memorial Pinochle Tournament on Saturday, February 4, at the Rutland Town Hall; Rutland City Council meeting at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, February 6, at the Rutland Town Hall; Rutland Community Club meeting at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, February 13, at the Rutland Town Hall; Annual Rutland Sportsmen’s Club’s Great Northern Pike Fish Fry on Friday, March 3, at the Rutland Town Hall; and Rutland Community Club’s Annual Fun Night & Carnival on Sunday, March 26, at the Rutland Town Hall.

Well, that’s the news from Rutland for this week.  For additional information about what’s going on in the little city that can, check out the community’s internet web site at www.rutlandnd.com, and take a look at the Rutland Facebook page while you’re at it, too. Don’t forget to patronize your local Post Office, and remember to keep the pressure on the U.S. Postal Service and the North Dakota Congressional delegation to SAVE OUR POST OFFICE! Later.

The Rooster Crows – Dec. 9, 2022

By Bill Anderson

Three inches of new snow on Tuesday, December 6. Three degrees below Zero on the morning of Wednesday, December 7, the 81st anniversary of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. Was this a repeat of that dastardly sneak attack, this time pulled off by Mother Nature? Predictions for next week, 13 inches of new snow, will have us looking back at this week with nostalgia. Well, we’ve survived sneak attacks and tough winters before this one, and we’ll still be around when Spring arrives, too. 

Ms. Maggie Ness, representing the Alzheimer’s Association’s Fargo office, accompanied Morgan Biss of Ransom-Sargent Senior Services, Lisbon, to the Rutland Seniors’ Center on Wednesday, November 30, where she spoke to the Rutland Seniors about The Basics of Dementia & Alzheimer’s. Her presentation included a discussion of risk factors that make the development of dementia and Alzheimer’s more likely. One week later the members of the Rutland Senior Citizens group still remembered Ms. Ness’s name and the topic of her presentation, so, things are looking good at the Rutland Seniors’ Center. Anyone who has questions for Ms. Ness may contact her at 701-356-2085, Extension 8639.

The members of the Board of Managers of Rutland Improvement d/b/a The Lariat Bar LLC met at 8:30 a.m. on Thursday, December 1, at The Lariat Bar in Rutland. Members Present were: Paul Anderson; Michael Wyum; Patty Woytassek; Rob Wyum; and, Katie McLaen; Also present was Manager Sue Kaehler. It was reported that all liquor and sales tax licenses have been obtained and are ready to be displayed as required by law. The Tobacco license has been applied for but has not yet been received.  Insurance policies covering the structure, furniture, equipment, and premises business operations has been obtained. The liquor liability insurance application has been submitted & is awaiting approval. All inventory has been ordered, and most items have been delivered. The Board decided to replace the refrigerator in the kitchen. It was reported that the new dishwasher has been delivered and is ready for installation. Installation of the Point Of Sale (POS) equipment and programming is proceeding slower than anticipated. This has been holding up getting the bar opened for business. All staff members: bartenders; waitresses; and cooks; have been hired and must be trained in the operation of the POS system before opening, otherwise the old-fashioned system known as “CASH” may have to be used. The menu and pricing have been completed and have been sent to the designer for layout & printing. Payroll will be done using QuickBooks and has been set up. Rutland Improvement has retained the services of a CPA, and the company’s Treasurer, Mike Wyum, will be working closely with Manager Sue Kaehler and the CPA to make sure that the train stays on track. Painting, except for the west wall, has been completed. A wallpaper border remains to be added in the hallway. Lights in the kitchen and hallway will be switched to new LED fixtures. The Brenco Company of Fargo has power scrubbed the floors, but they have not yet been resealed. The Aramark Co. has been contacted to get a quote for rugs with Rutland logos imprinted on them. The price quoted was $17.50 per rug every 2 weeks. A quote for rugs without logos is also being obtained. Security cameras for the exterior and interior of the Bar have been ordered and are expected to be installed by the opening date. The tentative opening date is December 10th depending on when the Point Of Sale System is fully installed & operational. Check Rutland’s internet web site at www.rutlandnd.com or the Rutland Facebook page for definite information on Opening Day for The Lariat Bar.

Continue reading “The Rooster Crows – Dec. 9, 2022”

The Rooster Crows – Dec. 2, 2022

By Bill Anderson

The four day Veterans Day weekend, from November 10th through the 13th, gave us rain, cold, ice, snow and slush, bringing down power lines, wrecking trees, damaging buildings and making traffic of any kind, pedestrian or vehicular, hazardous. The four day Thanksgiving weekend gave us sunshine, temperatures into the upper 40’s, and altogether pleasant conditions that raised spirits, melted snow, removed ice, and greatly improved conditions for travel and other activities. The Almighty giveth and the Almighty taketh away, in this case that turned out to be a mighty good deal. By Wednesday, November 30, conditions were back to winter, with a temperature of 9 above and a 25 mph northwest wind, but at least the ice and snow were gone, for a little while, anyway. Sometimes old guys wear their long woolies; Sometimes they wear the ones filled with down; sometimes they’re all in the laundry; then those old guys are the talk of the town.

A few years ago, the City of Rutland installed a speed limit sign with a flashing light on it along County Road #10/First Street, on the south side of town, in an attempt to slow down the traffic entering Rutland from the south. The sign is now missing, as is its flashing light. Anyone with information about the present location of the missing sign is asked to contact the City of Rutland at 724-3081. Traffic signs are expensive, and they are installed for the protection of the public. Some folks think that it is humorous to remove or deface traffic signs. Several years ago, someone thought that it would be fun to steal a STOP sign from the intersection of County Road #14 and ND Highway #11 at Geneseo. Shortly after the sign had been removed, a person unfamiliar with the area drove through Geneseo from the south and, as there was no sign, did not stop at the intersection. The driver’s vehicle was struck by a tractor-trailer rig in the center of the intersection. The driver was killed and her car was demolished. This was not humorous to any of the parties involved. If you have any information about Rutland’s missing speed limit sign, please see to it that the sign is returned so no one will have to carry a tragedy on their conscience for the rest of their life.

Paul Anderson travelled on Delta Airlines to Phoenix AZ on Tuesday, November 22, to spend the Thanksgiving holiday with his Mother-In-Law, Etha Quinlan of Sun City West, his daughter, Betsy, from Las Vegas NV, and his daughter, Katy, and her family from Seattle WA. Present at Etha’s home in Sun City for Thanksgiving Dinner were: Etha Quinlan; Paul Anderson; Betsy Anderson; Josh & Katy Elfering; Rhys Elfering; and, Arlo Elfering. Betsy, Josh, Katy and the kids all headed for home on Friday, November 25, and Paul arrived back in Fargo on the11:00 p.m. flight from Minneapolis on Sunday, November27.

Continue reading “The Rooster Crows – Dec. 2, 2022”