The Rooster Crows – November 6, 2020

By Bill Anderson

Well, here we are at Election Day 2020, finally.  As this column is being written, Americans are already heading to the polls on the East Coast, and by this time next week the votes will have been counted and canvassed, so who the voters chose, and who they rejected, will be known for sure, we think, maybe. Mother Nature chased Old Man Winter out of the house for the week, providing a beautiful series of Indian Summer days for the voters to cast their ballots and either celebrate their victories or mourn their losses. Voter turnout is expected to be at a record level, as more than 97 million Americans had already voted by mail, or in early voting, prior to Election Day. Some States had already exceeded their 2016 totals by Election Day 2020. What does it all mean? Well, don’t worry, we will have self-styled political experts, commentators and historians explaining it to us for the next century, and we will be able to take our pick of the opinions offered.  The one thing that most Americans are thankful for, though, is that it is over, for a few days at least. The 2024 campaign begins when the polls close on Election Day! The next election, like this one, will be the most important in our lifetime.

Like the 2020 political campaign, the 2020 harvest campaign is winding down in the Rutland area. There are still a few corn fields standing, and even a field or 2 of soybeans, but, for the most part, the 2020 harvest is in the bin and the proceeds are in the sock. Yields of 180 bushels per acre for corn and 40 bushels per acre for soybeans are considered to be “OK” these days, and reports are that yields for 2020 are in the “OK” to “way too good to talk about” category. As usual, there’s always something to take the glow off the occasion, though, and this year, again as usual, the price is too low.  Well, farmers are nothing if they’re not optimists, and there is another year coming. As the late Dave Hoflen of this community often noted, “There have been two good years in North Dakota, 1914 and next year.” So, we have a chance at the best year ever coming up in 2021, but you have to play the game if you want to be a winner.

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The Rooster Crows

October 23, 2020

By Bill Anderson

Mother Nature told Rutland and vicinity that “Enough is enough!” last week as she flipped the switch and turned off the pleasant autumn weather that had lulled some into thinking that Winter might never arrive this year. Old Man Winter hasn’t made his entrance, yet, but the sub-freezing temperatures at night, along with some cold rain showers, and even some light snow showers, are the calling cards announcing his intention to pay a visit in the near future. The cooler weather, along with harvest action, has livened up the whitetail deer bow hunting season, though, as more deer have gotten in the mood and are on the move. Jesse Brakke, with the advice and assistance of his great-nephew, Brody Mahrer, bagged a nice 4-point buck on the old Carl Christianson Farm in the SE¼ of Section 16 in Ransom Township last week, and other bow hunters have also reported success in the past several days. Those afield with shotguns, seeking the elusive ringneck pheasant have also been reporting good shooting in recent days. With nearly all of the soybeans and much of the corn in this area harvested and in the bin, the birds are now showing up and surrendering to their pursuers. The hunter still has to shoot straight, and the assistance of a good dog adds to the chances of success, but 2020 is shaping up to be the best year for pheasants in this area for quite some time.

Joe Breker reported that harvest activities on the Breker Farm south of Rutland wrapped up last week, the earliest harvest conclusion in many years. Joe said that all of the corn was dry enough to put in the bin right out of the field, eliminating the cost of drying that often adds to the expense of harvest. Joe practices “No Till Farming,” so his Fall tillage is done, too.

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