The Rooster Crows – May 13, 2022

By Bill Anderson

Spring has finally arrived, and the blizzards of April have been replaced by the thunderstorms of May. Last weekend, from the evening of Friday, May 6, to the morning of Monday, May 9, Rutland and the surrounding area received more than 2 inches of rain, every drop accompanied by a bolt of lightning and the rumble of thunder. There is some nervous pacing going on, as most farmers in the community have not yet turned a wheel planting the 2022 crop, due to the excessive moisture. Shane Breker has managed to get some wheat planted in the hills south of town, where the fields are better drained, but even Shane has about run out of hilltops that are solid enough to carry a tractor and planter. More rain is forecast through the coming weekend, and some are predicting that the Federal Crop Insurance Corporation will be looking at a lot of “prevented Planting” acres this year. Well, experience tells us that the weather can turn on a dime around here, and we might be crying for rain by Memorial Day, but, for now, just a little bit of “normal” would be nice.

If you can’t farm, you might as well go fishing. The local lakes are now full of water, and some of them are even full of game fish. Walleyes, crappies and northern pike just waiting to grab a hook and jump into the boat. During the first week of May, good catches of walleyes were reported at Buffalo Lake, about 6 miles north of town. No reports about fishing success at other lakes in the area have been received, but, in keeping with the Fisherman’s Code of Silence, that most likely means that the catching is even better on those bodies of water. The guys who aren’t fishing say that the fish aren’t biting, but they usually don’t bite if you don’t have a line in the water.

Roger Pearson reports that there is a shortage of good fishing minnows in the area. The ones that are available are either too small or already dead, he says. One bait shop in the area has a coin operated minnow dispensing machine that is a lot like playing the one-armed bandits at the casino. You put in your money, and you take your chances. It has been reported that minnows of the appropriate size are available at the bait shop in Britton SD, but transporting minnows across State Lines is illegal, so don’t do it. The minnows might get smart and turn you in.

Hal Nelson drove out to Beulah ND, out in the coal country on the west side of the Missouri River, on Friday, May 6 to visit his sister and brother-in-law, Lori & Larry Hruby. Hal says that the 40” of snow that was dumped on the Beulah area back in mid-April was very welcome, but not enough to break the drought that has devastated agriculture in that region for the past 2 years. Hal said that there was some green grass, but not much. 

Continue reading “The Rooster Crows – May 13, 2022”

The Rooster Crows – Apr. 22, 2022

By Bill Anderson

The more the weather changes, the more it stays the same. Like the movie “Ground Hog’s Day,” every day is a repeat of the day before: windy; cold; and, wet. There was a hot time at the old Town Hall, though, at 10:00 a.m. on Saturday, April 16, as more kids than you could shake a stick at gathered for the Annual Rutland Easter Egg Hunt. The event had been planned to take place at a more spacious venue in the great outdoors, Lou Sanderson Field, but the inclement weather forced the sponsor, the Rutland Community Club, to move it indoors. According to Community Club President Katie McLaen, the Easter Bunny, who remained at the scene for photographs, had hidden 3,000 eggs for the kids to find, and 100 for the participants in the newly added adult Egg Hunt. The Rutland-Cayuga Volunteer Firemen donated six bicycles that were awarded as door prizes to 6 fortunate youngsters. The ladies of the Rutland American Legion Auxiliary served caramel rolls, cupcakes, muffins, juice, and coffee to those in attendance. Congratulations to the Rutland Community Club for another successful community event. President McLaen also reports that the search is on for Miss Rutland 2022 to compete for the title of Miss Sargent County this coming Summer. The Community Club will also be hosting the Annual Rutland Community Block Party, to which the entire community is invited, in early June. The next Community Club meeting is scheduled for 5:00 p.m. on Monday, May 9, at the Rutland Town Hall. “Things are happening in the little city that can,” says Katie.

Local churches were full on Easter Sunday morning, it is reported. All three churches of the TNT Parish: Trinity Lutheran of Havana; Nordland Lutheran of Rutland; and Trinity Lutheran of Forman; were filled up, and it is also reported that all seats were filled at Saints Peter & Paul Catholic Church in Cayuga. 

Easter dinner guests at the Joanne Harris home in Rutland were Andy Harris; Paul Anderson; and Bill Anderson.

Easter weekend visitors at the home of Norbert & Beverly Kulzer were Stephen & Ann Kulzer of Hartford SD and their son, Will, of Brookings. Norbert reports that their two granddaughters were out of the area, Lauren working at a hospital in Kansas City, and Brooke working with the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service in North Carolina. Stephen, Ann & Will departed for home on Sunday afternoon, after the snow let up.

More rain on the morning of Wednesday, April 20. According to Chuck Anderson and Mike Banish, the correct amount received as of 10:00 a.m. was either 3 tenths or 30 hundredths, take your pick. This is added to the snow received last week and on Easter Sunday. As it stands right now, there should be enough moisture to start a crop, if only the weather would warm up a little.

Last week it was mentioned in The Rooster Crows that Noel Liermark of this community had passed away on the morning of Thursday, April 7, at his home in Rutland. Noel had attained the age of 81 years, 8 months and 14 days at the time of his death. Noel Gary Liermark was born in Brooklyn NY on July 24, 1940, to Ivan & Dorothy (Weissman) Liermark. His parents brought him up in the Jewish faith. According to Noel, his first name was supposed to have been Noah, but a clerk at the hospital typed in Noel and it stuck. During World War II Noel moved with his parents to Long Beach CA, where he grew up and attended school. According to his lifelong friend, Mike Silverberg, who flew in from Hawaii to speak at Noel’s funeral, he had the normal interests of a teenage boy of the 1950’s, sports, cars, and girls. He graduated from Long Beach Polytechnic High School in 1958. Following his graduation from high school, Noel worked with his father in the metal salvage business in Long Beach for a year before enlisting in the U. S. Army in August of 1959. During his time in the Army, Noel served a tour of duty with Military Assistance Command-Vietnam (MAC-V), headquartered at Saigon. During that time, American military personnel in Vietnam were officially considered to be Advisors, but the Viet Cong guerillas considered them to be combatants, and did not hesitate to take them under fire. Noel continued to serve in the Army until his Honorable Discharge in 1962. After returning home, he decided to go up to Lake Tahoe for a weekend, and ended up spending more than 40 years there, working in the gaming industry, for many years as a floor supervisor at Harrah’s Casino, one of the most prestigious of the Lake Tahoe gaming venues. It was at Lake Tahoe that he met Debra Vanderwolf, the love of his life. They were married on May 27, 1989, at Beaverton OR. They continued to make their home at Lake Tahoe until moving to Rutland in 2006. He developed a passion for cooking and enjoyed the company of his pet cats and dogs. Noel was a kind and gentle man who played a large role in the lives of his nieces and nephews. He is survived by his wife, Debra Liermark of Rutland; by a brother-in-law, Klaas Vanderwolf of Forman; and by several nieces, grandnieces, and grand nephews. He was preceded in death by his parents; by Debra’s parents, Hein & Toos Vanderwolf; and, by a sister-in-law, Gretchen Vann. The funeral service for Noel Liermark was at 10:30 a.m. on Tuesday, April 19, at Nordland Lutheran Church in Rutland, with Pastor Julie Johnson officiating. Military honors were rendered by Bergman-Evenson Post #215 of The American Legion. Interment will be in the Rutland Cemetery at a later date. Price Funeral Chapel of Britton & Forman was in charge of arrangements. Condolences may be sent to Debra Liermark, 213 Anthony Street, Rutland ND 58067. The Rutland community extends its condolences to the family and friends of Noel Liermark, a kind and decent man to whom strangers were just friends that he had not yet met.

Well, on the Post Office front, it’s still 3 out of 4: no action; no service; no Post Office. We can’t say “no information” any longer, however. Rodney Erickson reports that he has been contacted by an official at the U.S. Postal Services office in Colorado, and that he has submitted paperwork for a new Post Office location in Rutland. According to Rodney, the USPS now has some new requirements which it is doubtful whether any of the Post Offices currently in use in Sargent County satisfy. One of them is a requirement for at least 9 parking spaces, 2 of them handicapped accessible, and a number of them on private property. We’ll have to check out the Fargo Post Office one of these days, just to see how it stacks up. Representatives of the U.S. Postal Service were in Rutland on the morning of Wednesday, April 20, removing the Post Office boxes and other equipment from the former Post Office building. It was reported that the equipment would be stored at the Gwinner Post Office until a new facility in Rutland is secured.

Rutland native David Sundlie (RHs & SCHS Class of ’65) reports that his current hometown, Bismarck ND had more than a foot and a half of new snow dumped on it during last week’s 3-day blizzard that had most of the State shut down for several days. According to Dave, with the snow that fell down, was blown in and shoveled up, he now has about 4 feet of snow under the deck on his house, and he is looking for a neighborhood youngster to handle the snow chores from this point on. But then, Bismarck had it easy compared to Minot, where 3 feet of snow fell during the blizzard, and another 12 inches was added on Easter Sunday. With western North Dakota having suffered through 2 years of drought, the precipitation is not unwelcome, but cattlemen who are trying to raise a calf crop could do with a little less snow and a lot more sunshine right now. It’s hard to tell which has to be tougher, the cows or the cowboys.

Some upcoming events in Rutland include: Rutland City Council meeting at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, May 2, at the Rutland Town Hall; Rutland Community Clean Up Day on Saturday, May 7, all over town, with drop off points at the City’s inert landfill west of Lou Sanderson Field and at the City shop for electronic items; Rutland Community Club meeting at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, May 9, at the Rutland Town Hall; and, Memorial Day observances in Rutland commencing with military rites at 10:15 a.m. at the Nordland Cemetery & 10:30 a.m. at the Rutland Cemetery on Monday, May 30. The military rites will be followed by a program at the Rutland Town Hall, and by the traditional community pot-luck dinner at the Town Hall following the program.

The Rutland Cemetery Association reports that it has recently received 2 substantial donations to the Perpetual Care Fund. The first was a $10,000 donation from Jean Hauge, a daughter of Rutland natives Henry & Bertha (Moe) Skaarer, whose remains are buried in the Rutland Cemetery. Mrs. Hauge commended the Cemetery Association’s Board for the excellent care and maintenance that is provided for the cemetery grounds. The second donation was a $900 gift received from the Rutland Sportsmen’s Club’s gaming fund. The Rutland Cemetery Association is grateful to Mrs. Hauge and to the Rutland Sportsmen’s Club for their generous donations.

Meanwhile, on the North Dakota State scene, incumbent U.S. Senator John Hoeven is breathing a sigh of relief after narrowly fending off a challenge for the Republican Party’s endorsement during its recently concluded convention. Sen. Hoeven was challenged by ultra-conservative State Representative Dr. Rick Becker of Bismarck. Had Dr. Becker’s challenge succeeded, it would have been the first time that an incumbent U.S. Senator from North Dakota had been knocked off in a party convention or primary election since NPL candidate Wild Bill Langer beat out fellow NPLer Lynn J. Frazier back in June of 1940. It is alleged that Sen. Hoeven secured his renomination the same way he secured the GOP endorsement for Governor back in 2000, he bought it. According to Representative Becker’s supporters, Sen. Hoeven is not a bad guy, he’s just a bad Senator. That conclusion is probably the one and only thing on which Becker’s supporters and North Dakota Democrats agree.

Well, that’s the news from Rutland for this week. For additional information about what’s going on in the little city that can, check out the community’s internet web site at www.rutlandnd.com, and take a look at the Rutland Facebook page while you’re at it, too. Don’t forget to patronize your local Post Office and remember to keep the pressure on the U. S. Postal Service and the North Dakota Congressional delegation to SAVE OUR POST OFFICE! Later.

The Rooster Crows – Feb. 11, 2022

By Bill Anderson

As of Saturday, February 5, the bone-chilling cold that had characterized the month of January and the first few days of February gave way to more moderate temperatures, still not warm, but at least able to peek above the freezing mark for a few hours and provide some hope to those who had been considering giving up on Spring. It’s still Winter, though; the wind still blows; it can still get cold; the snow still falls; and the streets are still covered with packed snow and ice; but there is hope. In the middle of a North Dakota Winter what more can you want or expect. We can ask the one who put it there to relieve us of the snow, but not too far south of us, in south central and southeast South Dakota, there is no snow, and the weather experts are predicting severe drought conditions in the Spring, while signs warning of the extreme fire danger are posted on nearly every corner. We have to be careful what we ask for, we just might get it.

Local anglers have gotten what they wanted: ice; water; and fish; and they are happy with it, at least for now. Walleyes, northerns, perch and crappies have been biting, but sometimes here and sometimes there. One day there may be 40 ice fishing houses on a fishing hot spot, but when the catching slows down and a report is received that the fish are biting somewhere else, like an old-time gold rush mining camp, the fishermen and their houses pick up and move elsewhere, leaving their former location looking forlorn and deserted. We know that the fishing is pretty good, though, because the fishermen aren’t talking about it. In fact, it’s so good that they don’t even lie about it. That’s what’s called a contrary indicator. Whatever it looks like, it’s really the opposite. 

This community was saddened last week when word was received here that Violet Wyum, a life-long member of the Rutland community, and a long-time elementary school educator in Sargent County, had departed this life on the evening of Tuesday, February 1, 2022, at the Four Seasons Healthcare center in Forman. She had attained the age of 97 years, 2 months, and 25 days at the time of her death. Violet Martha Olson was born on the Olson family farm in Ransom Township on Friday, November 7, 1924, to Olof and Hilma (Peterson) Olson. She grew up on the farm and attended elementary school in a 1 room Ransom Township country school. She attended high school in Rutland and graduated in the RHS Class of 1942. She earned her 2-year teaching degree from Valley City State Teachers’ College in 1944, and taught school in 1 room country schoolhouses in Ransom and Tewaukon Townships before teaching in Cayuga, Cogswell and Rutland. While teaching, she took classes at Bethel College in St. Paul and at Valley City State to earn a Bachelor of Science Degree in Education in 1959. Thirty-two years of Violet’s teaching career were spent in Sargent County, including country schools, town schools and the Sargent Central Elementary School in Rutland. She also taught for one year in Bismarck ND, and one year in an elementary school in San Juan Capistrano in California. While at San Juan Capistrano she encouraged elementary students from Rutland to become pen pals with her students in California. Sixty-five years later some of those pen pals are still corresponding with each other. She is remembered by her former students as an effective teacher who knew how to maintain discipline in the classroom. Violet was a faithful member of the First Baptist Church in Rutland, serving as a Sunday School teacher; Sunday School Superintendent; Deaconess; Clerk; and, as a member of the choir. On June 3, 1961, she married Robert Wyum of Rutland in a ceremony in the First Baptist Church in Rutland at which Pastor Jack Reif officiated. They made their home on the Wyum farm 3 miles north and 1 mile east of Rutland. They became the parents of one daughter, Wendy Sue, and Violet became the stepmother of Robert’s 3 sons: Steven Robert; Michael Charles; and Mark Obed. Robert passed away in 2001, and Violet continued to make her home on the farm until she moved to Four Seasons Villas Assisted Living Center in 2019. From the time she retired from teaching until she moved to Four Seasons Villas, Violet served as the “go-fer” on the farm, making parts runs and performing other errands as well as preparing meals when called upon. For Violet, the speed limit was a suggestion, not a hard and fast rule. Her children and grandchildren often referred to her as “The Energizer Bunny” because she was always going full speed ahead, whether she was running for parts or scrubbing the floor. She relocated to the Four Seasons Healthcare Center nursing home in 2021. Violet is survived by: one daughter, Wendy Honchl; by 3 step-sons, Steven Wyum of Rutland; Michael Wyum of Rutland; and, Mark Wyum of Rutland; 1 sister, Shirley Mahrer of Hankinson; 1 brother, Don Olson of Mound City MN; 10 grandchildren; 20 great-grandchildren & 1 on the way; numerous nieces, nephews & cousins; and by a host of friends. She was preceded in death by her husband, Robert, in 2001; her parents, in 1955 & 1979; 4 brothers: Woodrow Olson; Martin Olson; Carl Olson; and Maurice Olson; and, by 2 sisters: Myrtle Orth; and, Alice Seline. The funeral service for Violet M. Wyum was at 10:30 a.m. on Wednesday, February 9, 2022, at Nordland Lutheran Church in Rutland, with Pastor Julie Johnson officiating. Also assisting in the service were Pastor Wayne “Hutch” Hutchins of the Baptist Church in Lisbon; soloist Karen Hutchins; vocalists Michael Wyum & Janet Kiefer; and, Phyllis Wyum, organist. Interment will be in the Rutland Cemetery in the Spring. Condolences may be sent to Michael Wyum, 9720 139th Avenue Southeast, Rutland ND 58067. The Rutland community extends its condolences to the family and friends of Violet Wyum, a woman of intellect, ability and character who devoted her life to her family, her community, her career and her country. Many will remember that Violet provided a moral compass for the Rutland community. If you couldn’t answer “Yes!” to the question “Would Violet think this is OK?” you had better not do it.

Continue reading “The Rooster Crows – Feb. 11, 2022”

The Rooster Crows – Feb. 4, 2022

By Bill Anderson

Here it is! The Rooster Crows is back! This writer’s move to a different residence in Rutland is still a work in progress, but the people and pets have relocated somewhat successfully. There are still boxes to open and unpack, and needed items to locate, but, on the bright side, some items have been found that haven’t been seen since the last move, back in 2019. If anyone finds a Rutland High School letterman’s jacket, Class of ’63, please let me know.

The bitterly cold weather endured by North Dakotans throughout the month of January has continued into February. The Ground Hog, Rutland Rasputin, saw his shadow on Ground Hog’s Day, Wednesday, February 2, presaging at least 6 more weeks of winter for this area. Had Rasputin not seen his shadow, winter weather would only have lasted for another 42 days. The high winds and blowing snow that hit the region on the evening of Monday, January 31, and continued on into Tuesday, February 1, even caused Waste Management to reschedule the regular Tuesday morning trash pickup to Wednesday, February 2. Rutland residents were notified of the change by telephone on Tuesday morning. A personal robo-call from the community’s garbage service provider is always appreciated.

The Rutland community was saddened to learn that Violet (Olson) Wyum, a lifelong member of the Rutland community, had passed away on the evening of Tuesday, February 1, at the age of 97 years. She was residing at Four Seasons Healthcare Center in Forman at the time of her death.  Additional information about Violet Wyum’s life among us will be in next week’s column.  Funeral arrangements had not yet been made as of this writing.  Price Funeral Chapel of Forman & Britton will be in charge of arrangements.

Continue reading “The Rooster Crows – Feb. 4, 2022”

The Rooster Crows – Jan. 14, 2022

By Bill Anderson

Old Man Winter tightened his grip on Thursday & Friday, January 6 & 7, providing those who love ice with some morning temperatures in the mid-20’s below Zero range, and not getting above Zero all day. Saturday’s high of +24 felt almost tropical, but it was only temporary, as the mercury plunged into sub-Zero territory again on Sunday & Monday. Warmer temps are predicted for mid-week, to be followed by a return of more frigid conditions. Well, it’s January in North Dakota, so what else is new? This information is provided just so those who are reading it while lounging on their patios at their winter residences in Arizona, Texas, Florida or some other warm & sunny location can be satisfied with their decision to head south for the winter. 

A brief “January Thaw” was experienced on Tuesday & Wednesday, January 11 & 12. The mercury soared all the way up to 37 above on Tuesday, with the warmer weather propelled by a 20-mph wind out of the south. Wednesday’s high only made it to +32, but that’s a lot better than -32. January weather is predicted to return by the weekend.

Snow, cold and Ice may be reasons for frowns and complaints from some, but snowmobile fans and ice fishing enthusiasts are grinning from ear to ear. With about 2½ feet of snow on the ground, and more where the wind has done its artistry, the entire countryside appears to be open to snowmobilers. After a couple of winters with little or no snow, though, some are still digging their snow cats out of the back of the shop or garage. The recent spell of sub-zero temperatures has given a great deal of depth and strength to the ice on area lakes, giving ice anglers the confidence to haul their insulated and heated ice castles out on local lakes and sloughs. Two fishermen trying their luck on one of the larger sloughs near Rutland reported that the ice was 18” thick, plenty of ice to hold the weight of a fishing house or a pickup truck. Anglers should still be cautious where the ice is covered by snow, though, as the insulating effect of the snow may have kept the ice a lot thinner. Just remember, even though it’s frozen, it’s still only water.

One ice angler reports that he was planning to relax in his fishing house with a mixed drink while waiting for the fish to bite when he realized that he had forgotten to bring ice cubes. Well, when you’re sitting on top of acres of ice, that’s no problem. So, he chipped out some ice cube sized chunks of ice and prepared to make his drink. Then he thought, “It’s still slough water, even if it’s frozen,” and he decided that the ice should be sterilized before using. He fired up his stove, filled a pot with water and heated it up to boiling temperature to get rid of any offensive germs and viruses. The sub-Zero chunks of ice were then dropped into the bubbling water. He states that the ice was so cold when he started that it was still frozen hard when he removed it from the pot. This fellow is currently looking for a job with a national political organization. For a fisherman, the “Big Lie” is small potatoes.

Continue reading “The Rooster Crows – Jan. 14, 2022”

The Rooster Crows – Dec. 24, 2021

By Bill Anderson

The 1 to 3 inches of snow predicted for Rutland and vicinity on the afternoon and evening of Friday, December 17, and the morning of Saturday, December 18, turned out to be about a foot of the fluffy white stuff. Maybe the hyphen shouldn’t have been between the 1 and the 3. The heaviest snowfall in the region was along the State Line, from Ellendale to Fairmount. According to the official Kulzer’s Hardware yardstick, 12 inches of snow fell in Rutland, and 13 inches were awarded to our neighbors in Havana. City Maintenance man Scott Haan was out opening streets in the still dark hours of early morning and kept at it all day long. It looks as if Rutland’s late Mayor, Ron Narum, has a worthy successor in the snow pushing department.

This community was saddened last Thursday when word was received here that Gwendolyn (Prindiville) Young of Rutland had passed away on Tuesday, December 14, at her winter home in Mesa AZ. Gwen had attained the age of 101 years, 3 months and 27 days at the time of her death. Gwendolyn Prindiville was born on August 17, 1920, on the Prindiville farm just south of Rutland, to John D. & Naomi (Barnhart) Prindiville. She was the second of their 6 children, and their only daughter. Gwen grew up in the Rutland community and completed both elementary and high school in Rutland, graduating in the RHS Class of ’38. Gwen’s high school class suffered tragedy when 4 RHS students were killed and 4 were injured in a collision with a Great Northern Railway locomotive near Fairmount during “Skip Day” just prior to graduation. At the outbreak of World War II, Gwen enlisted in the Women’s Army Corps (WAC) and participated in the invasion of North Africa in November of 1942 as a member of General Eisenhower’s headquarters staff. She served in Eisenhower’s headquarters in Algiers in 1943. While in Algiers, she met and married another soldier, John Young of Chicago IL. Following her military service, Gwen returned to Rutland. She and her husband had 4 children: John; Patrick; Harold; and Vincent. After being discharged from the Army and returning to Rutland, Gwen was employed as secretary by the Sargent County States Attorney, and later as office manager for the Sargent County office of the USDA’s Farmers Home Administration. In 1961 she succeeded her father as Postmaster at the Rutland Post Office, and she served in that capacity until her retirement in 1981. Gwen was a member of Sts. Peter & Paul Catholic Church; of Bergman-Evenson Post #215 of the American Legion, and of the American Legion Auxiliary; of the Rutland Community Club; and, of the Friendly Garden Club. She is survived by 2 sons: Harold Young; and Vincent Young; both of Mesa AZ; by 2 brothers: John “Pat” Prindiville of Horace ND; and Alan “Mike” Prindiville of Spokane WA; by numerous grandchildren and great-grandchildren; and, by a host of friends. She was preceded in death by her husband; her parents; by 3 brothers: Dennis; Gerald; and Roger; and by 2 of her sons: John; and Patrick. Gwen donated her body to a medical school in Arizona for medical research and training. A celebration of her life and inurnment of her cremains will take place in Rutland this coming Spring. The Rutland community extends condolences to the family and friends of Gwendolyn Young, a strong and resourceful woman who endured hard times with calm strength and good cheer.

Rutland native Corrine (Narum) Romereim of Wahpeton reports that she is making a good recovery after an accident back in October that left her with a broken wrist, a fractured pelvis and a large bump on her head. Corrine said that she had stepped outside her farm home west of Wahpeton to help untangle a dog that had wrapped its lead rope around a porch post. Once freed, the dog was so excited that it wrapped the rope around Corrine’s ankles, causing her to fall on the concrete driveway. “It can happen fast,” said Corrine. “You’re OK one second, and a second later you’re badly injured.” Fortunately for Corrine, her son, Rod, arrived at her home a short time later, found her in the driveway, and got her to the Emergency Room for care. She spent several days in the hospital, and several weeks in a rehab facility in Fargo before returning to her home. She is still doing the rehabilitation exercises, she said, and expects to continue them for some time to come.

Continue reading “The Rooster Crows – Dec. 24, 2021”