The Rooster Crows — February 12, 2021

By Bill Anderson

The month of February has brought with it the coldest weather of the year, making January, the usual cold weather champ, seem like a semi-tropical memory by comparison. Starting on Wednesday, February 3, the day after Ground Hog’s Day, the mercury began to drop and has only risen above the zero mark on a couple of occasions since then. But, while frigid temperatures are torture for some, they are opportunity for others. Mr. Sawyer Toepke, an elementary student at Sargent Central, reports that he is organizing a hockey team, and that he already has 20 prospective players lined up, if they can find 20 pairs of skates and 20 hockey sticks. Sawyer should probably be thinking of lining up a team dentist, as well. The optimism of youth sees opportunity where others see only misery and discomfort. Hang in there, Sawyer, and bring the NHL’s Stanley Cup back to Sargent County some cold winter day. That ought to make the sun shine! As the old timers used to say, “Nobody ever succeeded beyond their wildest expectations, unless they had some wild expectations to begin with.”

Ice fishing! The cold weather now has the ice on local water holes thick enough for reasonably sane anglers to get out there and go after the ever elusive walleye. Some reports have been received of a few fishermen having some success on a local body of water that bears the name of three former Sargent County Commissioners. If you know your county’s history, you might be able to figure out where that hot spot might be, but by then the fish will have quit biting. Have faith.

Rutland native Mavis (Hoflen) Wold called friends here on Friday, Feb. 5, reporting that she is still in the hospital recovering from the broken leg she suffered a month ago. Mavis said that she had been working in the kitchen of her Minneapolis home when she lost her footing, fell and sustained the broken leg. She is currently undergoing therapy, and hopes to be back in her home in the near future. Mavis is the eldest daughter of the late Oscar & Alma (Anderson) Hoflen of this community. She is a member of the RHS Class of ’47. Her many friends here wish her a speedy recovery and return home.

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The Rooster Crows — February 5, 2021

Ground Hog’s Day, Tuesday, February 2, was a grey and cloudy day in the Rutland area, and, although no one actually saw the local ground hog, Rutland Rasputin, the assembled wise men were of the opinion that he more than likely did not see his shadow on the appointed day. This means that there will not be 6 more weeks of winter, as there would have been if he had sighted his own shadow, and that it is likely that winter will be nearing its end in only 42 days, more or less. Other important upcoming indicators of Winter’s approaching demise include the commencement of Daylight Savings Time on Sunday, March 14, the day on which time miraculously springs ahead precisely 1 hour, and the Vernal Equinox which will occur on Saturday, March 20, this year. Time does march on, even though the near term weather forecast is for sub-zero temperatures that will freeze everything in place for the next week or so. Well, as the old timers used to say, “If you don’t like the weather in North Dakota, just wait a minute. It’ll change.” Those old timers knew what they were talking about, and even when they didn’t they sure talked as if they did. They could predict with certainty exactly what was going to happen, and they could explain, with equal certainty, why it didn’t. The times may change, but people don’t.

One of Rutland’s regulars, Joe Malstrom, has been in the hospital recently, receiving treatment for a stubborn infection. As of this writing, Joe is occupying a swing bed in the Lisbon Hospital. His many friends here wish him a speedy recovery and a quick return to his home in Rutland.

Mac Pherson of this community was also on the sick list for a few days last weekend. He was an impatient patient in Sanford Hospital, Fargo, from Friday through Sunday, January 29-31, and reported that he expected to be back home by Monday, February 1. His many friends in Rutland wish him a speedy recovery.

Bert Siemieniewski reports that she has recently sold her home on Anthony Street to Mr. Bob Adermann and his son. Bert has been employed by the U. S. Postal Service at Gwinner for the past few years, and has moved to an apartment in that city.  Bert and her late husband, Ray, purchased the home from the Eldon & Bernice Thorson estate back in 2001. Other owners of the property include: Carl & Tina Ahrlin; Blenda Ahrlin; and, Bill & Marcella Kastner. The Kastners built the house that is presently situated at the site. During her years in Rutland Bert has been active in the Rutland Community Club and she has served several terms on the Rutland City Council. The Rutland community extends best wishes to Bert in her new pursuits, and a warm welcome to the Adermanns. Thanks for picking Rutland for your new home.

The Rutland City Council had two applicants for the City Council vacancy. After a draw from the hat, the City Council appointed Lori McLaen to replace Bert Siemieniewski on the Council during the regular monthly meeting on Monday, February 1. Ms. McLaen had previously served several terms on the Council, so she knows the ropes. Welcome back, Lori.

Meanwhile, on the national scene, the second impeachment trial of former President Donald J. Trump is set to commence next Tuesday, February 9. The former President has been charged with inciting a mob to commit insurrection in the nation’s Capitol back on January 6, when he was still President. The House of Representatives charged him with the offense in an Article of Impeachment adopted on January 13. Mr. Trump’s term as President ended at Noon on January 20, but many of his followers have refused to accept the fact that Joe Biden won last November’s Presidential Election, and that Donald Trump lost. They tried to keep Trump in office by overthrowing the government of the United States of America. Millions of Americans, including nearly all of the Congressmen and Senators, heard the words and saw the actions that led to the impeachment. What the Senators do with the evidence is anyone’s guess, but early indications are that a majority, but not 2/3, of the Senators will vote to convict Mr. Trump, and to bar him from holding any other national office. Prior to his election in 2016, Mr. Trump had a well-deserved reputation as a penny-ante pettifogging windbag, and since January 6, 2021, his ambition to rise to the level of two-bit tin-pot tyrant has also been revealed. What’s coming next in the Trump drama is unknown at this time, but as history has shown, you can’t count him out. Like Count Dracula, until he is buried with an oaken stake through his heart, he’ll be back.

Well, that’s it from the little city that can for this week. For additional information about what’s going on in Rutland, and with Rutland folks, check out the community’s internet web site at www.rutlandnd.com, and stop by the Rutland Facebook page while you’re touring around in cyberspace, too. Don’t forget to patronize your local Post Office, and remember to keep the pressure on the U. S. Postal Service and the North Dakota Congressional delegation to SAVE OUR POST OFFICE! Later.

The Rooster Crows

October 23, 2020

By Bill Anderson

Mother Nature told Rutland and vicinity that “Enough is enough!” last week as she flipped the switch and turned off the pleasant autumn weather that had lulled some into thinking that Winter might never arrive this year. Old Man Winter hasn’t made his entrance, yet, but the sub-freezing temperatures at night, along with some cold rain showers, and even some light snow showers, are the calling cards announcing his intention to pay a visit in the near future. The cooler weather, along with harvest action, has livened up the whitetail deer bow hunting season, though, as more deer have gotten in the mood and are on the move. Jesse Brakke, with the advice and assistance of his great-nephew, Brody Mahrer, bagged a nice 4-point buck on the old Carl Christianson Farm in the SE¼ of Section 16 in Ransom Township last week, and other bow hunters have also reported success in the past several days. Those afield with shotguns, seeking the elusive ringneck pheasant have also been reporting good shooting in recent days. With nearly all of the soybeans and much of the corn in this area harvested and in the bin, the birds are now showing up and surrendering to their pursuers. The hunter still has to shoot straight, and the assistance of a good dog adds to the chances of success, but 2020 is shaping up to be the best year for pheasants in this area for quite some time.

Joe Breker reported that harvest activities on the Breker Farm south of Rutland wrapped up last week, the earliest harvest conclusion in many years. Joe said that all of the corn was dry enough to put in the bin right out of the field, eliminating the cost of drying that often adds to the expense of harvest. Joe practices “No Till Farming,” so his Fall tillage is done, too.

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The Rooster Crows – Jan. 10, 2020

By Bill Anderson and Deborah Banish

“Lions and tigers and bears, oh my! Lions and tigers and bears, oh my!” chanted Dorothy and her companions as they danced along The Yellow Brick Road on their way to the Emerald City and the land of Oz, in the 1939 movie classic “The Wizard of Oz.” So far, there have been no reports of tigers and bears in the Rutland area, but, as for lions, oh my YES! Joe Breker reports that as he was giving grandchildren and others a sleigh ride through the hills near the Coteau des Prairies Lodge south of Rutland on Saturday, December 28, he heard the kids erupt into sudden screaming and yelling, so he stopped the tractor with which he was pulling the sleigh in order to investigate the source of the uproar. Joe feared that one of the grandchildren may have fallen off the sleigh, but that was not the case. The cause of the excitement proved to be the sighting of a mountain lion that had crossed the trail just after the sleigh had passed by. A quick thinker in the group managed to snap a picture of the big feline with their cell phone camera. Joe checked out the big cat’s tracks in the new snow and states that they were larger than his hand, definitely not the tracks of a stray tabby. Some of the older children followed the lion’s tracks for a short distance and found where it had bedded down for a while, in the trees below Frenier Dam. Joe was grateful that the kids had not caught up with the mountain lion, as well. Once you have a lion by the tail, is it more dangerous to hang on or to let go? As of Monday, December 30, the lion had not been sighted again, but that doesn’t mean that it’s not around. Lions & Tigers & Bears, oh my!

The Rutland community entered the New Year of 2020 with another new citizen. Miss Peyton Marlys Gulleson was born to Cameron and Jenny Gulleson of this community on Monday, December 30, 2019, at Sanford Hospital in Fargo ND. Peyton weighed in at 9 pounds 7 ounces and stood 22 inches tall in her bare feet at the time of her arrival. Although Peyton entered this country without a valid Passport or a Visa and was totally unable to support herself or provide for her basic needs, she was welcomed with open arms by the Gulleson family and the Rutland community. Peyton is making her home on the Gulleson farm 1½ miles east of Rutland with her parents and her older sister, Dylan. Welcome to Rutland, Peyton. Get ready to butter lefse and serve that lutefisk, too!

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The Rooster Crows – July 13, 2018

By Bill Anderson

Well, here we are: the Summer Solstice, the mid-point of the Solar Year, was 3 weeks ago; June 30, the end of the first half of the calendar year, was 2 weeks ago; and, the 4th of July, Independence Day, the mid-point of Summer vacation, was just a week and a half ago. Only 5 weeks to go until the kids head back to school. Ain’t that a pip!? Sun, rain, wind and heat continue their work, though, no matter what the calendar, or the School Board, says. The thunderstorm that brought rain to this area on the evening of July 2 and morning of Tuesday, July 3, deposited .5 of an inch on Rutland, according to Roger Pearson’s rain gauge, while the gauge of his next-door neighbor, Norbert Kulzer, recorded .6 of an inch. Everything is back to normal. Another rain on the evening of Sunday, July 8, a Thunderstorm that rolled through at about 8:00 p.m. left .2 of an inch in Roger Pearson’s rain gauge and also .2 of an inch next door, at Norbert Kulzer’s.  Jesse Brakke reported .4 of an inch at his farmstead between Rutland & Cayuga, Jim Lunneborg .65 of an inch at his farm in Shuman Township and Rick Bosse .8 of an inch on Sunday evening, and another .18 at about Midnight to bring the total at Brampton to just under an inch. But that’s not all! The next thunder and lightning show started at about 3:00 a.m. on Tuesday, July 10, and dropped about .75 of an inch of rain on Rutland, with more to the west and southwest, as Rick Bosse reported another inch at Brampton and Judee Silseth reported 1.4 inch at the Silseth farm southwest of Silver Lake. Paul Anderson reports that his electronic rain gauge has recorded nearly 10 inches of rain at Rutland since the 1st of June. By contrast, only about 1.5 inch of precipitation was received during the months of April and May. Some wheat fields in the area are beginning to exhibit that greenish, golden hue that indicates the first round of harvest activity may be commencing around the end of July.  The wheat crop looks very good right now, but, as we know, “…it’s never as good as it looks from the road,” and that’s the truth!

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