The Rooster Crows – January 11, 2019

by Bill Anderson

We are now in the post-holiday season, when all of the fun and frivolity of the past 6 weeks is weighing heavily on our waistlines, if not on our consciences. Well, there’s a cure for that! The Board of Directors of the Rutland Fitness Center recently sent out notices that it’s time to pay annual dues, and to start working off all of those Thanksgiving and Christmas calories. Membership renewals are now due for the Rutland Fitness Center, the Directors have reminded us. Membership fees are $150.00 per year for an individual and $235.00 per year for a family membership. Membership fees may be sent to: RFC, PO Box 24, Rutland ND 58067. Members are asked to include their cell phone # so the new entry code can be sent to them. The code will change on January 12. Due to insurance requirements, minor children utilizing the Fitness Center must be supervised by a responsible adult at all times. The Rutland Fitness Center is located in the American Legion Hall at 123 Gay Street in Rutland. It is open 24 hours a day and 7 days a week to members. At that price, the cost is about 3 cents an hour for a Family membership. A small price to pay for individual, family and community fitness and good health. Directors of the Rutland Fitness Center are: Ione Pherson; Lori McLaen; and Jennifer Christianson.

Sonja Christensen reports that, as of Monday, January 7, 41 teams of pinochle players had preregistered for the 24th Annual Rudy Anderson Pinochle Tournament that will be held on Saturday, February 2, 2019, in the Rutland Town Hall. One team that will be new to the tournament is a father-daughter combination from Grand Forks who read about the tournament on Rutland’s internet web site and then contacted Sonja to sign up. Sonja anticipates that another 21 to 25 teams will have registered before play begins on Ground Hog’s Day. The tournament, which is co-chaired by Sonja Christensen and Bryce Carlson, is sponsored by the Rutland Community Club. Continue reading “The Rooster Crows – January 11, 2019”

The Rooster Crows – April 11, 2008

By Bill Anderson

Old Man Winter’s role in the drama of 2008 is supposed to be over, but the doddering old actor can’t seem to find his way off the stage and keeps coming back for curtain calls long after the audience has tired of his cold and dreary performance. Despite the fact that Sargent County snowbird Harlan Klefstad has returned from Arizona, the fact that farmers have tractors fueled and planters ready, the fact that Canada geese are starting to nest, the fact that the snow geese have moved on to the North and the fact that fat robins are scratching around for their next meal in local yards, Winter made another appearance here last weekend, dropping another 4 to 6 inches of wet, heavy snow on this area on Sunday, April 6, with enough wind to make the storm as close to a blizzard as we have seen this year. Snow covered roads and slippery conditions slowed traffic and delayed the start of classes at local schools by 2 hours on Monday morning. Sunny days and temperatures that climbed into the mid-40’s on Monday and up to 53 on Tuesday cleared away most of the snow by Tuesday afternoon. Mark Wyum reports that Sunday night’s high winds blew many fields clear, depositing the snow in draws and coulees that will make good tractor traps in another week or so, when Spring planting commences.

Continue reading “The Rooster Crows – April 11, 2008”

The Rooster Crows – January 19, 2008

The weather and the stock market have both been bouncing around like a yo-yo on a string for the past week, but now it appears that both the weatherman and the stock brokers have made up their minds, sending both into the tank. The mercury hit 15 below zero in Rutland on Monday morning, then topped out at 22 above by Tuesday afternoon before starting a slide into the cellar that is not predicted to stop until it hits bottom at 25 to 30 below sometime this weekend. Well, the weather forecasts aren’t always right, but why is it that they usually miss when they’re predicting sunny and 70, but are rarely wrong when predicting ferocious, frigid and frozen? Ask your stock broker, he’s as likely to have the answer as the weatherman.

Cameron Gulleson, Mark Wyum and Rob Wyum drove down to Texas during the first week of January to discuss contracts for spraying crops in that area with Texas farmers. Cameron and Rob, along with Lance Gulleson and Cody Gulleson, own and operate an agricultural chemical application business, and the boys are looking for a way to keep the equipment rolling year-round. Reports are that the number of acres planted to winter wheat in Texas, Oklahoma and Kansas is way down this year due to increases in the acreage going into the production of corn, soybeans and milo. King Cotton in Texas has suffered the same fate as King Wheat in North Dakota. They have both been deposed in favor of a new regime. As a result, there is now a shortage of wheat and the price has soared to stratospheric levels for winter wheat, spring wheat and durum. The price could just as well be $100.00 per bushel, though, because no one has any to sell right now. There is one thing, though, that the American farmer can do better than produce, and that’s overproduce, so just give him a few years with some timely rains and it won’t be long until crop prices are back in the tank with the weather and the stock market, too. Continue reading “The Rooster Crows – January 19, 2008”