The Rooster Crows – May 6, 2022

By Bill Anderson

The year of 2022 is one-third gone and we are now enjoying the merry month of May, when a young man’s fancy blithely turns to thoughts of a new fishing boat with which he can pursue those lunker walleyes. Sometimes romance enters into the equation, but neither a boat nor a walleye are capable of returning much in the way of affection. Well, at any rate, at least we are now getting some sunny days and some temperatures in the low 60’s that are in the “normal” range for this time of the year. Of course, we had all of those “below normal” days in April that must be made up in the coming weeks. Cam Gulleson reports that he had recently heard a weather expert explaining that the month of April 2022 was the coldest, wettest, and windiest April since the year of 1886. 1886 was the year that James J. Hill’s Great Northern Railway constructed its tracks and brought its trains to Rutland, and the year that Prindiville’s Saloon was built. None of Rutland’s residents who were residing here in 1886 are disputing Cameron’s report, so it must be true. Rutland’s current residents are just hoping for “normal” in 2022. That’s not asking for too much, is it? Just once, once in 136 years, can the month of May, and maybe June, be normal? Well, we do live in North Dakota, where “normal” is a point on the weather spectrum that we pass on our way from too cold to too hot, too wet to too dry and back again.

Another report from Cam Gulleson is that the Gulleson Ranch is nearly done with Spring calving. As of Monday, May 2, the Gullesons had delivered more than 600 calves, and had about 70 to go. They didn’t think that they would have to be battling Winter in April, but this is North Dakota, after all.

Four young ladies of this community: Greta Bladow, daughter of Brian & Trish Bladow and the late Wendy Bladow; Kaycee Hamilton, daughter of Kenny & Tanya Hamilton; Whitney Mahrer, daughter of Mike & Kayla Mahrer; and Charlize Willprecht, daughter of Kevin Willprecht and Wendy Willprecht; affirmed their baptism and became confirmed members of Nordland Lutheran Church here on Sunday, May 1. These young women impress all who meet them. Their families, their church and their community are justifiably proud of them all.

The Rutland City Council met at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, May 2, at the Rutland Town Hall, with Mayor Mike Mahrer; City Auditor Deb Banish; and Council Members Rodney Erickson; Delores Lysne; and Lori McLaen present. City Council member Colton Corry was absent. Sargent County Water Resource Board Member Mike Wyum and Water Resource Board Engineer Nathan Trosen of Moore Engineering, Fargo, were present to discuss Drain 8 with the City Council. Mr. Wyum said that the Water Resource Board had discussed what it can legally do with the Drain, and what the city would be legally able to do with the drain. The State of North Dakota requires a cost-benefit analysis for all County Water Resource Board water projects. Engineer Trosen discussed the slope and pipe requirements of the project that would have to meet State criteria. An economic analysis is required by the State to determine the cost and benefits of any future project. Mr. Wyum said that safety is a big concern but that is not a factor in the State’s analysis. Another option is for the Water Resource Board to abandon the drain to the City and the adjoining property owners. The Water Resource Board currently has about $103,000 in the Drain #8 fund that is available for a project; and, that an engineer’s analysis of a proposed project would cost about $20,000. Mr. Trosen said that a storm water model analysis could be done comparing the cost and effectiveness of 8”, 10” and 12” pipes. a full summary had been done in 2015 and that data could be used. The Council discussed the cost of an analysis and the different size pipes. The Council agreed that a 12” pipe would be the minimum needed. Moore Engineering will use the existing data and studies and develop an analysis based on those figures using a 12” pipe. There are also minimum standards and safety issues that must be complied with in any project. The Drain #8 matter will continue to be discussed at future meetings.

Continue reading “The Rooster Crows – May 6, 2022”

The Rooster Crows – Apr. 29, 2022

By Bill Anderson

The thunderstorm that moved through the Rutland community late on Friday night and early Saturday morning, April 22 & 23, was a real rip-roaring, rumbling, rattling, rocking & rolling sound and light show, combined with a downpour that dumped .84 of an inch of rain at the Mike & Debbie Banish farm south of town; 1 inch at the Chuck & Mary Beth Anderson farm in Weber Township; .85 of an inch at the Mark & Kathy Wyum home in Rutland; 1½ inch of rain at Jesse Brakke’s Ransom Township farmstead between Rutland & Cayuga; and, more than 2 inches at Rick Bosse’s farm near Brampton. A 4.6” gully-washer near Crete, in the northwestern corner of Sargent County, washed out a substantial section of County Road #2 near Kraft Lake, according to Sargent County Commissioner Lyle Bopp. The temperature shot up to 72 above by Noon on Saturday, and then began a rapid decline to 24 degrees by 6:00 on Sunday morning, as the weather front moved through. The forecast for the week calls for more rain and more cold, with freezing temperatures most nights until the first week of May is behind us. Well, at least there was half a day of nice weather on Saturday, April 23. There was some consternation on the afternoon of Tuesday, April 26, when a bright object appeared in the sky to the south southwest of Rutland. Concerns were relieved, though, when it was confirmed that the object was actually the Sun, making its first appearance in quite some time. It was a welcome sight, and it is hoped that it will show up a little more often in the future. There is general agreement that a week or two without freezing temperatures sometime between now and Labor Day would be nice.

Rodney Erickson reports that the paperwork he submitted to the U.S. Postal Service concerning a new Post Office location in Rutland has been received by the office in Colorado in charge of the project and is under consideration. Rodney was informed that it might take a month or two for the Postal Service to get someone up to Rutland to look things over and make a recommendation about the floor plan for a new facility. It takes a lot of planning to figure out how to put a lobby for the public up front; office space, work area & storage in the rear; and a screen line with customers’ Post Office boxes and a service window in between. Speed does not appear to be of the essence. The Post Office boxes, service window and other USPS equipment were removed from the old Post Office last week and taken to the Gwinner Post Office to be stored until they can be installed at the new location. Let’s hope that the Postal Service can remember where it put this stuff when the time comes to use it again. As of the end of April, it will have been 7 months since the door on the old Post Office was locked “for a few days.” Since then, several local volunteers have been making daily trips to Forman to pick up mail at the Post Office there and deliver it to the intended recipients in Rutland. A few years ago, before the gang that now runs the Postal Service from its lair in Washington DC was appointed, the aim of the operation was to be faster, more efficient, and less expensive. The current Postmaster General has a new goal: slower; less efficient; and, more expensive. It is time for the Congress of the United States, the body that has the statutory and Constitutional responsibility to oversee the operations of the Postal Service, to fire the Postmaster General and the entire Board of Governors of the USPS. They can then be replaced with competent individuals of good character who have the best interests of the American people in mind. So, come on John, Kevin and Kelly, step up and do your job!

In another Main Street development, The Stock Growers Bank, formerly The Sargent County Bank, has listed the Lariat Bar and its contents with the Steffes Auction Company in Fargo, to be sold sometime in mid-June. According to Casey Bopp of Stock Growers Bank, it is the Bank’s intention to sell the property as a “turnkey operation,” ready for a new buyer to get up and running in short order. The Lariat Bar has been closed since March 5, when former operators Pete & Michelle Denault, decided to terminate their lease. The Denaults had a good business going but decided to leave the business due to personal concerns. Anyone wishing to obtain additional information about the Lariat Bar in Rutland can contact Casey Bopp at Stock Growers Bank in Forman, 701-724-3216, or check out Steffes Auction’s web site at steffesgroup.com. The Lariat Bar is a great business opportunity for anyone who is willing to put forth some effort. It’s better than having a license to print your own money.

Continue reading “The Rooster Crows – Apr. 29, 2022”

The Rooster Crows – May 21, 2021

By Bill Anderson

It was a million-dollar rain that fell on the evening of Thursday, May13 & the morning of Friday, May 14, less adjustments for interest, inflation, carrying costs and additional charges. The grumble of thunder and the angry flashes of lightning that preceded the rain belied its gentle nature. Greg Donaldson reported .6” of precipitation in his rain gauge on the east side of town, while Andrew & Katie Woytassek gauge situated a quarter of a mile further east showed .5” on Friday morning. Other readings included: .75” in Mahrer Construction’s gauge on the north side of town; .6 at Jesse Brakke’s farmstead between Rutland & Cayuga; .6” at the Joe & Patty Breker farm in Tewaukon Township; and 1 full inch at Rick Bosse’s farm near Brampton. The rain was enthusiastically welcomed by local farmers in the process of getting the 2021 crop planted. “We had about 3 days of planting left to do,” said Jerry Woytassek on Friday evening, “but I’ll take the rain when it comes, and be happy about it, too!” Obviously, this rain will not make the 2021 crop, but it will help give it a good start. There are many travails to endure and worries to bear before the grain is in the bin, the cash is in the sock and the checks are in the bank. Until then, let it rain!

Rutland native Dan Narum stopped in at The Lariat Bar on the evening of Wednesday, May 12 for a meeting with his cousin, Trent Nelson, and to get together with old friends for some visiting in the old hometown. Dan currently serves as the Presiding Judge of North Dakota’s Southeast Judicial District. Dan said that the covid-19 pandemic made it difficult to maintain court schedules during the past year, but with remote hearings made possible by electronic technology, court services were able to be kept up throughout the North Dakota Judicial System. Dan also reports that he has once again been sharpening a skill he learned from his Dad, the Late Dennis Narum, back when he was growing up in Rutland. He has acquired 3 registered quarter-horse colts and has been training them on the acreage at his home in Lamoure ND. The colts are registered descendants of the famous Doc Bar bloodline, Dan said, and the American Quarter Horse Association exhibited its sense of humor by assigning the name “Hanging Judge Bar” to one of his colts, the one that Dan calls “Little Tex.” Dan said that he, Caroline and their 2 children, Asher, and Ellery, are all doing well, and he extended greetings to all of his old friends from Rutland.

May birthdays honored at the Rutland Seniors Center on Monday, May 10, included: Janice Christensen; Roger Pearson; Rick Bosse; and Mike Kulzer. All are over 21 years of age. Those present were treated to a big slice of birthday cake baked and decorated by Ione Pherson, and to a rousing chorus of “the Happy Birthday,” song. So, Happy Birthday to all, and many more!

Continue reading “The Rooster Crows – May 21, 2021”

Hens Do Crow! July 24, 2020

Monday, July 20, brought another round of rain to the area with various amounts of moisture reported. Shawn Klein reported that her rain gauge measured .40 inches at her home in Havana while Kenny Hamilton boasted .97 inches. Two-miles south of Rutland the rain was measured at .23 inches and north of Rutland at the Kyle and Kathy Marquette farm about two-inches of rain had fallen and the same storm left 1.2 inches north of Cayuga on the Rick Banish farmstead. The last few rainstorms have left varying amounts in the rain gauges.

The Rutland Housing, Inc., Board met on Monday, July 20, followed by the annual Housing meeting. Some Housing tenants attended the meeting to discuss the need for repairs at the buildings and some minor safety improvements such as exterior rails on the steps to help residents enter and exit the buildings in the winter. The Housing Board has not been able to hire a handyman to make repairs and changes as quickly as desired. There is also the ongoing issue of funding and expenditures as the units are not at full capacity to provide sufficient income.

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Hens Do Crow! April 12, 2019

By Deborah Banish

The 48th Annual Meeting of Rutland Housing, Inc., the non-profit corporation that owns and manages three apartment houses in Rutland, was held at 5:00 p.m. on Wednesday, April 3, 2019, in the Rutland Town Hall. Manager-Treasurer Bert Siemieniewski delivered the annual report of corporate activities for the past year as well as a financial report that showed a positive balance in the corporation’s books. Ms. Siemieniewski reported that, as of April 3, there were 9 apartments occupied and 5 apartments available for occupancy. She also reported that there are a number of prospective tenants who are expected to move into some of the available apartments in the near future. All three of the company’s apartment houses have undergone major renovations and improvements in the past few years, and work continues on updating and upgrading apartment units as funds are available. Rutland Housing was established in 1971 to provide housing for low income elderly persons in the community utilizing a long-term low interest financing program from the USDA’s Farmers Home Administration. The first apartment house, the four-plex at 207 First Street, was occupied on January 1, 1972. Two more apartment houses, another four-plex at 316 Ross Street and a six-plex at 204 Dakota Street, were built between 1972 and 1975. Rutland Housing’s first Board of Directors included: Earl Anderson; Rudy Anderson; Norbert Kulzer; Aldon Donaldson; and, Skip Sjothun. Kenny Briese was the manager of the Farmers Home Administration program in Sargent County in the early 70’s, and his knowledge of FmHA’s rules, regulations and procedures was instrumental in obtaining the financing to build the apartment houses. Current Directors and Officers of Rutland Housing, Inc., are: Delores Lysne, President; Bill Anderson, Vice-President; Carolyn Christensen, Secretary; and, Bert Siemieniewski, Treasurer/Manager. For information about renting one of Rutland Housing’s apartments, contact Manager Bert Siemieniewski at 724-3553. The next annual meeting of Rutland Housing, Inc., is scheduled for the first week in April, 2020.

Continue reading “Hens Do Crow! April 12, 2019”

Hens Do Crow! March 29, 2019

By Deborah Banish

Agriculture was the focus on Thursday, March 21, with a salute to Farmers, Ranchers and Ag Businesses. The Ag Day event, organized by the NDSU Sargent County Extension Office, had been postponed due to the weather (what else!). It was held at the North Sargent School Activity Center and students from the three area schools attended as well as area farmers and ranchers and other residents. This event provided an opportunity for people in the community to become more aware and appreciative of ND agriculture. There were educational displays and talks about ND agricultural commodities, food samples made with ND grown commodities, and ag business representatives at the event to show and tell how they support farmers and ranchers to produce the food to feed the world. The County Extension Office extended a big thanks to North Sargent ag education and family and consumer science students and their teachers, Tanner Zetocha and Kylie Christianson; volunteers Phyllis Wyum and Kathy Marquette, ag businesses and their reps including CHS Dakota Plains, AW Diesel, Green Iron Implement, Full Circle Ag, Joe’s Fertilizer, Wild Rice SCD, and USDA NRCS; sponsors and donors including Arrowhead Transport, KT Cattle Company, Sargent County Farmers Union, Sargent County Farm Bureau, Four Star Ag, Bryan Johnson, District 7 Cattlewomen, ND Beef Commission, ND Wheat Commission, ND Corn Council, Midwest Dairy, ND Soybean Council, and ND Livestock Alliance, the North Sargent School, and all who attended the National Ag Day Salute to Farmers, Ranchers and Ag Businesses event! You all contributed to make it successful and fun! The Extension Office hopes to make this an annual event.

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