Hens Do Crow! June 12, 2020

On Wednesday, May 27, 2020, Vernon Leist of this community was injured when the motorcycle he was driving was struck by a wild turkey. The accident occurred on ND Highway #11, near the Southeast Water Users water plant about one mile east of the Rutland corner. The impact of the 10-12-pound bird in flight was enough to cause Mr. Leist to lose control of the motorcycle which tipped over and slid along the pavement. He suffered numerous cuts, abrasions, and several broken ribs because of the collision and contact with the road surface. Vern was taken to the new Sanford Hospital in Fargo by the Sargent County Ambulance Service, Forman squad, and received medical treatment there for more than a week. He is now undergoing rehabilitation treatment at Cobalt Rehabilitation Hospital, 4671 38th Street South, Fargo ND 58104. Mr. Leist said on Saturday, June 6, that he still has no clear memory of the accident and does not remember if he was going to Lidgerwood, or coming home from Lidgerwood, at the time it occurred. His many friends in the Rutland community wish him a speedy recovery and a quick return to his home here.

The Nordland Lutheran Church Council met on the evening of Tuesday, June 2, to establish a schedule and procedures for resuming worship services and other activities in the congregation’s Sanctuary and Fellowship Hall in Rutland. According to Nordland Council Chairman Hal Nelson, Sunday worship services will resume at 9:00 a.m. on Sunday, June 14, with Pastor Nicholas Rohde officiating. Hal said that face masks and social distancing will be required of all in the sanctuary, except those who are excepted by CDC guidelines. “The coronavirus pandemic is still on the move,” he said, “and we don’t want anyone to become infected, or to infect others, while attending worship services.” He urged anyone who has questions to check the Nordland Lutheran Church Facebook page.

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The Rooster Crows – July 6, 2018

By Bill Anderson

When in the course of human events it becomes necessary to celebrate the independence and liberty of a great nation and a great people, there’s no better way to do it than with the fireworks and fury of a good, old-fashioned thunderstorm. Thunder, lightning, wind and rain rolled through Rutland at about 3:30 in the morning on Friday, June 29, leaving enough water in its wake to do some good, and not enough to do any harm. Roger Pearson reported that his rain gauge showed .2 of an inch, while Norbert Kulzer’s gauge showed .3 of an inch right next door. Shawn Klein reported that .25 of an inch was recorded at Havana, and Dennis Goltz stated that .2 of an inch was received at his farm in Weber Township. Kurt Breker finally broke the drought at his farm 1 mile south of Cayuga with a timely .3-inch rainfall, and Jim Lunneborg reported that .2 of an inch had fallen at his farm in Shuman Township. The precipitation is keeping crops doing well throughout Sargent County. Now, if only there was a price…

Back on July 2, 1776, John Adams predicted that date, the date on which the original Resolution Of Independence was adopted by the Second Continental Congress, would be celebrated with bands, flags and fireworks by future generations of Americans, and Mother Nature honored that prediction with another thunderstorm that rolled through on the evening of Monday, July 2, with heavy rain to boot. As it was still raining as of the writing of this article, though, no report of amounts is yet available. The deluge was reminiscent of “pitchforks and hammer handles,” though.

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The Rooster Crows – June 15, 2018

By Bill Anderson

Oh, listen to the rumble, hear the rattle and the roar, as she tears her way ‘cross the prairie, over hills and down the shore. Hear that mighty wind a’whistlin’, this ain’t no railroad train. It’s a monster of a thunderstorm, and it’s bringing in more rain! Accompanied by thunder, lightning and a powerful east wind, between .6 and .75 of an inch of rain blessed the Rutland area early on the morning of Monday, June 11. Roger Pearson reported .6 of an inch in his rain gauge at 409 Gay Street, and 1 block west, at 309 Gay Street, Paul Anderson’s electronic rain gauge recorded .74 of an inch. Harvey Bergstrom reported that his gauge situated 3 miles south of Cayuga showed precisely .63 of an inch on Monday morning, with a few intermittent showers yet to pass through, while Bonnie Anderson reported that the rain gauge at her farm three miles north and 3 miles east of Rutland registered .75 of an inch, and Doug Spieker stated that the rain gauge at his Tewaukon Township farmstead registered .95 of an inch when he headed to town for coffee and conversation on Monday morning. You can’t make it rain, and you can’t make it stop, but you can appreciate it when it arrives. Harvey Bergstrom reports that the flag leaf is beginning to emerge on his wheat fields, and, that with some sunshine and a little more rain, the wheat will soon be shooting heads. Harvey says that he’s not counting his chickens before they’re hatched, but right now there are enough eggs out in those wheat fields to produce a lot of chickens, metaphorically speaking.

The Rutland community has acquired another new citizen, the old-fashioned way. Easton Edward Erickson was born to Jake & Taryn Erickson of this community on Friday, June 1, at Sanford Hospital in Fargo. Easton weighed in at 8 pounds 4 ounces and stood 20½ inches tall in his bare feet on arrival. Easton is residing with his parents at the Erickson farm southeast of Rutland. He is the 6thgeneration of Ericksons to reside on the family farm since it was homesteaded by his great-great-great-grandfather, August Erickson, back in the early 1880’s. Welcome to Rutland, Easton. We will expect to hear some stories and original songs from you in the future. You are Raymond’s great-grandson, after all. Better get to work on Great-Grandpa ray’s coin tricks, too.

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The Rooster Crows – May 11, 2018

By Bill Anderson

A quarter of an inch of rain early on the morning of Tuesday, May 8, reminded those racing to get the 2018 crop planted that rain is still a possibility in this land that early explorers once described as “The Great American Desert.” Roger Pearson, Jim Lunneborg and Mark Wyum all agreed that rain gauges and the size of puddles in the farmyard confirmed a ¼ inch rainfall in the Rutland area on Tuesday morning. To our north, Mark Gainor reported a .4-inch rainfall in the Milnor area. Despite the scarcity of rain so far this Spring, all reports are that soil moisture appears to be in good shape, so far. According to Mr. Gainor, the area between Milnor and Cayuga appears to be the wettest in the eastern half of Sargent County. The frost has not yet gone out of the soil, though, and conditions may change rapidly when that occurs. Well, as the old-timers used to say, “It always rains after a long dry spell;” and, “Every day that it doesn’t rain is one day closer to the day that it will.” So, that big rain is getting closer, and better times are comin’. As of Monday, May 7, some of the Spring Wheat in Ransom Township, between Rutland and Cayuga, is up!

The Lariat Bar in Rutland has extended its hours, once again opening at 11:00 a.m. and serving meals at Noon. Day One for the new schedule was on Monday, May 7, when proprietors Mike Pyle and Scott Beyer served a “Noon Special” that included a salad bar and a main course of homemade chicken pot pie. Mighty tasty, by all accounts. A “Noon Special” is planned for each day, and patrons will also be able to order items from the Bar’s lunch menu. A Noon eating place on Main Street is a service that is greatly appreciated by the community. The Lariat Bar can be checked out on Facebook or on the business’s internet web site at lariatbarrutlandnd.com. The phone number at The Lariat is 724-3610. Stop in for fine beverages, excellent cuisine and friendly service at the Lariat Bar in Rutland, where Mike, Scott, Janice, Cheryl and Sue provide service with a smile. No reservations needed. Come as you are.

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The Rooster Crows – April 11, 2008

By Bill Anderson

Old Man Winter’s role in the drama of 2008 is supposed to be over, but the doddering old actor can’t seem to find his way off the stage and keeps coming back for curtain calls long after the audience has tired of his cold and dreary performance. Despite the fact that Sargent County snowbird Harlan Klefstad has returned from Arizona, the fact that farmers have tractors fueled and planters ready, the fact that Canada geese are starting to nest, the fact that the snow geese have moved on to the North and the fact that fat robins are scratching around for their next meal in local yards, Winter made another appearance here last weekend, dropping another 4 to 6 inches of wet, heavy snow on this area on Sunday, April 6, with enough wind to make the storm as close to a blizzard as we have seen this year. Snow covered roads and slippery conditions slowed traffic and delayed the start of classes at local schools by 2 hours on Monday morning. Sunny days and temperatures that climbed into the mid-40’s on Monday and up to 53 on Tuesday cleared away most of the snow by Tuesday afternoon. Mark Wyum reports that Sunday night’s high winds blew many fields clear, depositing the snow in draws and coulees that will make good tractor traps in another week or so, when Spring planting commences.

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