The Rooster Crows – February 15, 2008

By Bill Anderson

Brother, it’s cold outside. Twenty below zero on Sunday, February 10, and the weatherman says we ain’t seen nothing yet. Despite the frigid temps, signs of Spring can be seen, however. Hope springs eternal, so they say, and there are none more optimistic than those who sell seed when it’s 20 below in preparation for the golden harvest to come next Summer and Fall. Wenzman Seed has been making deliveries of corn and soybean seed to Sargent County’s foremost seed dealer, Kulzer Feed & Seed of Rutland. Mike Kulzer reports that most local farmers have ordered their seed for the 2008 crop, but some seed, particularly wheat seed, is a hard to get item this season. Call Mike at 724-3345 for top quality seed for a top quality crop. On the livestock side of the ledger, Jordan Wyum has been busy with calving duties for his herd of 150 black angus heifers. So far the calving season is progressing well, despite the cold weather. The next time you purchase a roast beef at the local grocery store, or order a prime steak at a local cafe, pause for a moment to remember the labor of the cattlemen who worked all night in below zero cold to make sure that prime beef made it to your plate.

Dennis Prindiville, Pat Prindiville and Michael Prindiville were in Rutland on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday last week, in residence at the Prindiville family farmhouse on the south side of town. They had been in Bismarck on Monday, where they attended the funeral of their brother and uncle, Roger Prindiville. Although retired, Pat is still employed, part-time, measuring grain in storage for the auditors at grain elevators. At 72, Pat still climbs up the grain bins to check things out, although he says that he leaves some of the taller bins to his business partner, a much younger man, only 71 years of age. Pat’s son, Michael, assists them on some of the bigger jobs. On Wednesday Pat was measuring up the grain in storage at the Fullerton Elevator.

Continue reading “The Rooster Crows – February 15, 2008”

The Rooster Crows – January 25, 2008

By Bill Anderson

The stock market was about all that was dropping faster than the temperature this past week. The mercury bottomed out at 20 below on the mornings of Saturday and Sunday, January 19 & 20, but the stock market is still in free-fall with no bottom in sight. When it finally does hit bottom, the impact is likely to send shock waves around the world. The only thing colder than the weather this past week was the reception given to the President’s so-called economic stimulus program, seen as too little, too late and off target, unless you happen to be a major corporation or one of the super-rich, in which case it’s only seen as too little and too late.

Janice Christensen timed it just right this year, as she departed Rutland on Thursday, January 17, bound for Honolulu and a cruise in the Hawaiian Islands just in time to miss the coldest weather of the Winter, so far. Janice was accompanied on the trip by her niece, Janelle Brakke of Fargo. They are scheduled to return to reality on Sunday, January 27. Brad Christensen has been running the shop at the Lariat Bar during Janice’s vacation holiday.

Continue reading “The Rooster Crows – January 25, 2008”

The Rooster Crows – January 19, 2008

The weather and the stock market have both been bouncing around like a yo-yo on a string for the past week, but now it appears that both the weatherman and the stock brokers have made up their minds, sending both into the tank. The mercury hit 15 below zero in Rutland on Monday morning, then topped out at 22 above by Tuesday afternoon before starting a slide into the cellar that is not predicted to stop until it hits bottom at 25 to 30 below sometime this weekend. Well, the weather forecasts aren’t always right, but why is it that they usually miss when they’re predicting sunny and 70, but are rarely wrong when predicting ferocious, frigid and frozen? Ask your stock broker, he’s as likely to have the answer as the weatherman.

Cameron Gulleson, Mark Wyum and Rob Wyum drove down to Texas during the first week of January to discuss contracts for spraying crops in that area with Texas farmers. Cameron and Rob, along with Lance Gulleson and Cody Gulleson, own and operate an agricultural chemical application business, and the boys are looking for a way to keep the equipment rolling year-round. Reports are that the number of acres planted to winter wheat in Texas, Oklahoma and Kansas is way down this year due to increases in the acreage going into the production of corn, soybeans and milo. King Cotton in Texas has suffered the same fate as King Wheat in North Dakota. They have both been deposed in favor of a new regime. As a result, there is now a shortage of wheat and the price has soared to stratospheric levels for winter wheat, spring wheat and durum. The price could just as well be $100.00 per bushel, though, because no one has any to sell right now. There is one thing, though, that the American farmer can do better than produce, and that’s overproduce, so just give him a few years with some timely rains and it won’t be long until crop prices are back in the tank with the weather and the stock market, too. Continue reading “The Rooster Crows – January 19, 2008”