The Rooster Crows – May 28, 2021

By Bill Anderson

Mother Nature has been sparing of rain so far this year, but more than generous in the supply of wind provided to her loyal patrons in Sargent County. The rain that fell on Rutland and vicinity last Wednesday & Thursday, May 19 & 20, measured between .18 and .38 of an inch, depending on whose rain gauge you checked, but the 40 to 50 mph winds of Monday & Tuesday, May 24 & 25, whisked most of it away to parts unknown before it could be utilized by thirsty crops. Well, Memorial Day weekend is coming up, and, as the old-timers often observed, if we don’t get rain over Memorial Day, “Katy bar the door!” as the Summer is likely to be long, dry and hot. Of course, once in a while the old-timers were wrong. Let’s hope so!

Some Rutland folks have already rung up 2021 as a success. Larry Christensen of this community reports that his brother, Leo, now a resident of Papillion NE, a suburb of Omaha, called on Thursday, May 20, to inform his younger brother that he had just hit a hole-in-one on a par 3 hole on a golf course near Papillion. In keeping with the ancient tradition regarding such things, Leo bought a round at the clubhouse for everyone who was at the course at the time of his accomplishment. Skill finally triumphed over luck. Leo is one of the sons of the late Fred & Laura Christensen of Rutland. He is a 1961 graduate of RHS, a combat veteran of the USMC and a longtime employee of North Central/Republic/ Northwest/Delta Airlines, first in Fargo and later in Omaha. His wife, Gayle, is a daughter of the late Floyd & Salina Arneson of this community. Leo’s old friends in Rutland extend their congratulations to him, and expect to hear the complete story the next time he visits in his old home town.

Things are looking up on the covid-19 pandemic front, too. No dramatic holes-in-one, but steady progress provides the encouragement. The following report was received from Sargent County Public Health District Administrator Brenda Peterson on Monday, May 24: “the state is recommending we follow CDC guidelines. https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/daily-life-coping/participate-in-activities.html If you are fully vaccinated, you can resume activities that you did before the pandemic, without wearing a mask or physically distancing, except where required by federal, state, local, tribal, or territorial laws, rules, and regulations, including local business and workplace guidance. This is different in health care settings also. The link to the website may be your best option for scientific data. I understand the studies have found vaccinated people are not carriers, but that is just my unscientific generalization. 

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The Rooster Crows – May 14, 2021

By Bill Anderson

Mother Nature has been cautious in her approach to Spring this year. The cool weather persists, although it has been gradually climbing into short sleeved shirt conditions, with highs in the upper 60’s and lower 70’s predicted for the coming weekend. Ma Nature has been sparing with the precipitation, too, as .1 to .2 of an inch of rain fell in the Rutland area on Wednesday, May 5. The cool, dry conditions have been great for getting the field work done, though. Planting has been proceeding at a rapid pace throughout Sargent County. Bruce Speich of Milnor reported on Monday, May 10, that he and his sons were down to 300 acres of beans and 110 acres of corn left to plant near Delamere. Rick Bosse reported on Wednesday, May 12, that Spring planting was nearing completion in the Brampton area, too. No predictions are being made as to what the results will be this Fall, but, for now, things are looking up.

CORRECTIONS! In the April 30, 2021, column, the name of Ted Lee was inadvertently omitted from the list of members of Bergman-Evenson Post #215 who comprised the ceremonial detail for the graveside service for the late Urban Hoistad. The service was held at the Nordland Cemetery southeast of Rutland on Monday, April 26. Ted Lee also serves as Post Chaplain for the Rutland American Legion Post.

In the May 7, 2021 column, the date on which Curt & Renee Larson observed their 50th Wedding Anniversary by renewing their vows should have been Saturday, May 1, not Sunday, April 25. They were married on Saturday, May 1 back in 1971, and renewed their vows 50 years later, to the day. The author of this column apologizes to Bergman-Evenson Post #215 & Ted Lee, and to Curt & Renee Larson, for the omission and for the error.

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The Rooster Crows – May 7, 2021

By Bill Anderson

Big trucks, little trucks, big tractors, bigger tractors, planters, rock rollers, rock pickers and every other kind of machinery needed to plant a crop have been moving through Rutland this week as spring planting finally got into high gear. Commodity prices are up, covid-19 cases are down, the Sun is shining, the sky is blue, God is in Heaven and all is right with the world this week, at least so far. The temperature is still going up and down, too, from a high of 86 on Saturday, May 1, to a predicted low of 50 on Wednesday, May 5. In between, though, there was a very comfortable 74 on Sunday, May 2. Reports from the field are that the timely rain received back in April was just what the Doctor ordered, as soil moisture is good throughout the area. Even some combines have been observed, heading off to the shop to be serviced and made ready for the upcoming harvest season. Hope still springs eternal, on the farm as well as on the ball diamond.

The Sargent County Public Health District has reported more encouraging news on the covid-19 front this week. According to District Health Nurse Briana Spellerberg, there were 8 active covid-19 cases in Sargent County as of Tuesday, May 4, down from 16 a week earlier, and the percentage of adult County residents who have received at least 1 vaccination shot is at 53.6%, up from 52.8% a week ago. County Health Nurses Spellerberg and Chapin will be administering vaccinations to workers at the Bobcat Factory in Gwinner later this week. To make an appointment to obtain a vaccination, call: the Sargent County Public Health District in Forman at 724-3725; Forman Drug in Forman at 724-6222; or, Sanford Clinic in Oakes at 742-3267. All 3 of the currently approved vaccines: Moderna; Pfizer; and, Johnson & Johnson; are now available, although they may not all be available at the same time from the same supplier. Congratulations to the personnel of the Sargent County Public Health District, Forman Drug and Sanford Clinic for the work they are doing to protect the people of Sargent County from the ravages of the coronavirus.

Kaia Mahrer of this community was in Grand Forks on Thursday & Friday, April 22 & 23, completing her final examination for certification as an Emergency Medical Technician (EMT). She started the course last fall, and, due to covid-19 restrictions, completed most of her studies in a virtual classroom, on line. As a music teacher at Sargent Central, she’s used to teaching that way, and now she’s used to learning that way, too. Kaia will be working with the Forman Ambulance Squad of the Sargent County Ambulance Service. Congratulations to Kaia on her accomplishment, and on her dedication to community service.

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The Rooster Crows – April 23, 2021

By Bill Anderson

April seems to be bucking the season. It opened with a beautiful weekend over Easter, with lots of sunshine and temperatures in the 70’s, but the farther it goes, the colder it gets. The low temperature in Rutland on Wednesday, April 21, was 25 degrees and snow flurries, while Fargo set a record for cold on this date with 18. That’s 82 degrees colder than the record high for the same date of 100 above, set back in 1980. Thursday, April 22, was the 42nd annual Earth Day, a day dedicated to contemplating what we have been doing to our planet, and how to correct our blunders. Not to worry, though. President Joe Biden has hosted a “Climate Summit” of world leaders to discuss the situation. In keeping with the spirit of the occasion, and in observance of worldwide covid-19 recommendations, the summit was a virtual one, held online via ZOOM or some other video conferencing program. Picture it, hundreds of elected presidents and prime ministers, hereditary monarchs and tyrannical dictators in bathrobes, sweat suits and bedroom slippers, wearing facemasks and sitting in front of their computers, sipping coffee and discussing the fate of the world. Should we be comforted? Ask the Assembled Wise Men 42 years from now and they’ll let you know.

Hal Nelson has been treating an injured leg for the past week, the injury sustained while fishing at Sprague Lake. The walleyes had been biting, so Hal was out there enjoying the sport when he noticed some action on his line. He jumped to get the line and set the hook, slipped on a rock and fell onto some willow stumps left by a foraging beaver. The willow stumps were sharpened like punji stakes and put some serious scratches on Hal’s leg. He is getting around, though, and hopes to be back up to full speed in the near future.

Kenneth Maly of Chinook MT was visiting old friends in Rutland on the evening of Wednesday, April 14. Kenny is one of the sons of the late Francis & Rozilla Maly, and he grew up on the Maly family farm in Weber Township, south of Rutland. He is now employed by the Blaine County highway department out of Chinook, and he states that the county there has more than 1,300 miles of county gravel roads to maintain. Gravel is difficult to obtain for parts of Blaine County, Kenny says, and some roads are posted warning drivers to stay off of them when it is wet. “They might be out there until it dries up again,” he says. Kenny was employed by the Sargent County Road Department back in the 1990’s, before he moved to Montana. He planned to drive to Minneapolis to visit his daughter and 5-year-old granddaughter on Friday, April 16, and to return to Rutland on April 22 for a few more days of visiting friends and family here before returning to Montana. Kenny says that he likes living in the Chinook community, but he still has plenty of good friends and good memories in Rutland, too.

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The Rooster Crows – April 9, 2021

By Bill Anderson

Good things come to those who wait,” the old timers used to say, and once again, they were proved right on the evening of Tuesday, April 6, and the morning of Wednesday , April 7. The drought was not broken, but the edge was taken off of it as a steady drizzle deposited .4 of an inch of rain on Rutland and vicinity as of 9:15 on Wednesday morning, according to Norbert Kulzer’s rain gauge at 415 Gay Street. Roger Pearson, whose rain gauge issituated only a few feet away from Norbert’s, and generally measures less rain than Norbert’s, hadn’t checked his gauge yet, so, at least for now, Norbert’s rain gauge is right. Large amounts of precipitation are not in the near term forecast, but the weather gurus are predicting that showers and damp weather will persist until the weekend. To paraphrase Winston Churchill, “This rain may not be the end of the drought; it may not even be the beginning of the end; but, it may be the end of the beginning.”

The Rutland community is beginning to move to the “New Normal” of the post covid-19 world. On Saturday, April 3, The Rutland Community Club resurrected the community’s traditional Easter Egg Hunt for children in the community.  The event was held in the Rutland Town Hall and in the adjacent City park & playground. The following reportwas received from Community Club President Katie McLaen: “There were over 3,000 eggs hidden and over 50 kids hunting. In addition to the usual prizes, the Rutland Volunteer Firemen donated 6 bicycles as Grand Prizes. Nate Peterson; Raegan Roney; Ruth McLaen; Axel Hanson; Corbin Carlson; and, Jemma Schuster; won them. The Lariat Bar served rolls, juice, bloody Mary’s and mimosas. Hiding the eggs took almost an hour, with 7 people. Finding the eggs only took about 10 minutes.” Thanks to the members of the Rutland Community Club for starting the community revitalization process, and thanks to the Firemen for donating the bicycles.

Despite rapid progress being made on the vaccination front, the covid-19 battle is not yet won, according to Sargent County Public Health District Administrator Brenda Peterson. Ms. Peterson reports that adequate supplies of vaccine are now being received, and that all County residents 18 and older are now eligible to be vaccinated against the virus.  Sargent County now has all three of the vaccines approved for use in the U. S.: Pfizer; Moderna; and Johnson & Johnson; available.  She also said that the County’s nurses will be administering vaccinations at each shift at the Bobcat factory in Gwinner this coming week. Additionally, they will be in the three public schools in Sargent County: Sargent Central; North Sargent; and, Milnor; administering vaccinations to students who are age 16 or older, with parental permission, beginning next week. Sargent County’s covid-19 case count has been at or near 10 for a while, but 10 new cases were reported as of Tuesday, April 6, so the virus is still a threat to public health and the fight is not yet over. Sargent County Public Health has worked through its waiting list, said Ms. Peterson, so those who want a vaccination can now obtain it very quickly. To make an appointment for a covid-19 vaccination call: Sargent County Public Health at 724-3725; Forman Drug at 724-6222; or Sanford Clinic at 742-3267.

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The Rooster Crows -March 26, 2021

By Bill Anderson

The Equinox has come and went; Back to Ireland has St. Pat been sent; But no one’s complaining that it’s been a bummer; Cause we’re on the downhill slide from here to Summer! Spring arrived on Saturday, March 20, and Sunday, March 21, the first full day of Spring 2021, was full of sunshine, bereft of wind and perfect for sitting on the porch to survey the neighborhood. Still no rain, but, as the old timers used to say, “Every day that it doesn’t rain is one day closer to the day that it will.” Can’t argue with those old timers. Those modern-day old timers, the Assembled Wise Men at the Round Table, were once asked how it was that they seldom made mistakes. “Experience!” they replied. Then the question was asked, “How did you obtain experience?” “By making mistakes,” was the response. So it goes, from one generation of old timers to the next.

Norbert & Beverly Kulzer, Bill Anderson and Andy Harris joined Joanne Harris of this community for a St. Patrick’s Day supper on the evening of Wednesday, March 17. The main course was the traditional Irish meal of corned beef, cabbage and boiled potatoes. At the conclusion of the evening the hostess and guests drank a toast to the memory of the late John Harris, a descendant of Irish immigrants who took great pride in his Irish heritage. The Irish invented Guinness and Jamiesons, both of them being outstanding gifts to humanity.

Dale & Lisa McLaen of this community were back in the old hometown from Friday, March 19 to Sunday, March 21. Dale has been in the Twin Cities for the past several weeks, consulting with medical personnel at Hennepin County Medical Center. He reports that teams of doctors, sometimes as many as 6 at a time, have been examining, double-checking, discussing and diagnosing his condition for a couple of weeks, and that surgery is now planned for Thursday, March 25. Follow up treatment will be decided upon after that. As of Sunday, March 21, with the sun shining and Spring in the air, Dale said that he is feeling positive, and is ready for the surgery to be done. His many friends here wish him a speedy recovery and return home.

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