The Rooster Crows – June 22, 2018

By Bill Anderson

The skies opened, and the rains came! Accompanied by the ruffles and flourishes fanfare of an impressive thunder and lightning symphony, Rutland received 1.7 inches of rain beginning at about 7:00 on the morning of Saturday, June 16. There were smiles all around as the Assembled Wise Men received precipitation reports during the morning coffee and conversation hour at The Lariat. Two rain gauges that are hardly ever in agreement, those of next door neighbors Norbert Kulzer and Roger Pearson in the 400 Block on Gay Street, both measured 1.7 inches, creating quite a quandary. If they never agree, then one must be right and 1 must be wrong, but if one must be right and one must be wrong and they both agree, what then? Well, who cares? In fact, it was a great rain that will go a long way toward making the wheat crop that is now beginning to shoot heads.  Jesse Brakke’s electronic rain gauge recorded 1.8 inches at his Ransom Township farmstead, Mark Wyum reported 1.5 at his farm shop about 1½ mile northeast of Rutland, and Doug Spieker said that his gauge showed .95 of an inch at his Tewaukon Township farm home on Saturday morning. About .8 was reported at Rick Bosse’s farm near Brampton, and Mark Wyum stated that the gauge on land that he farms near Crete, in the northwestern corner of Sargent County, only showed .1 of an inch. Rutland and vicinity received another .6 of an inch late Saturday night and early Sunday morning along with another healthy dose of thunder and lightning, bringing the 24-hour total up to about 2.3 inches in Rutland. “Rain makes grain,” is the old saying, and as crop prospects go up the price of major farm commodities goes down. Prospects for good farm income have taken a double whammy in the past few weeks, though, with corn and soybean prices being the first casualties in America’s escalating trade war with China and the folks who used to be our allies in Europe. Well, our President has said that trade wars are good, and easy to win. Who wins the war isn’t very important to those who get wiped out in the first battles, though.

When it comes to rain, timing is everything. Richland County Commissioner Nathan Berseth, a frequent Rutland visitor in recent years, reports that one inch of rain fell at his farm a little northeast of Colfax on Saturday morning, giving a much-needed boost to growing crops in that area. However, Nathan had just cut hay the day before, and as always happens when your hay crop is cut but not yet stacked or baled, the rain soaked the windrows leaving Mr. Berseth to be on the lookout for sunny skies and drying winds, at least for a few days.

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