The Rooster Crows – June 17, 2022

By Bill Anderon

Despite the wet Spring that had delayed field work until the end of May, this community was pleased to get the rain that fell on Friday night, June 10. As soon as it doesn’t rain for a few days, a true North Dakotan starts to worry that it will never rain again, or, that when it does rain it will be too much, too little or in the wrong place. It can’t be helped. It’s in the blood. Roger Pearson reported .3 of an inch in his rain gauge on Saturday morning, while his next-door neighbor, Norbert Kulzer, had .4 of an inch in his gauge a few feet away. Norbert’s reading was matched by the .4 in Lary Arneson’s gauge, 2 blocks to the west. Chuck Anderson reported .37 of an inch at his Weber Township farm6 miles southwest of town; Harvey Bergstrom reported .31 of an inch in the gauge at his farm 3 miles south of Cayuga; and, Kurt Breker had .3 of an inch in his gauge 1 mile south of Cayuga. Another .1 or .2 of an inch was scattered across the countryside on Sunday & Monday, helping to keep lawn mowers and mosquito swatters busy. Well, the old timers used to say that it always dries up after a wet spell. We’ll just have to find out if they knew what they were talking about.

The Annual Rutland Community Block Party opened up at 5:30 p.m. on Wednesday, June 8, with more than 100 community residents and over 3,000 water balloons on hand for the festivities. The Rutland Volunteer Fireman manned the grills, turning out burgers, bratwursts, and hot dogs for participants, and also provided water game facilities for the community’s youth. During the Block Party, Miss Abbie Erickson, daughter of Rodney & Andrea Erickson, and a Senior at Sargent Central High School, was crowned “Miss Rutland 2022; and, Corbin Carlson, son of Bryce & Casee (Hawkinson) Carlson, and Lilith Pavek, daughter of Corey & Sarah (McLaen) Pavek, were awarded the titles of Mr. & Miss Lefse for the coming year. All 3 of Rutland’s reigning royals will be in the 2022 Uff-Da Day Parade on Sunday, October 2, 2022. The Rutland Community Block Party is held each year to give the community’s present, former and future residents an opportunity to get acquainted and re-acquainted, to talk over old times and to make plans for future good times. Thanks to Rutland Community Club President Katie McLaen for the information in this report.

Katie McLaen also reports that the Rutland Community Club met at 7:00 p.m. on Monday, June 13, at the Rutland Town Hall. The meeting was short. It was reported that the stage curtains in the Town Hall had been repaired and cleaned; and, that lefse production for Uff-Da Day 2022 will commence with a morning and an evening session on Thursday, June 16. Check the community’s internet web site at www.rutlandnd.com and the Rutland Facebook page for more information about the dates and times for future sessions. Fourteen sessions have been scheduled between mid-June and mid-August, so far.

Continue reading “The Rooster Crows – June 17, 2022”

The Rooster Crows – May 27, 2022

By Bill Anderson

Last Spring, it was too dry. This Spring, it’s too wet. On the average, though, it’s just right. This Spring, the weather has not been cooperating with the Spring planting plans of farmers in this area. Just when it seems that fields will get dry enough to allow the spring’s work to proceed, along comes another bolt of lightning, rumble of thunder and a quarter inch of rain to keep things at a standstill. With the market prices of wheat, corn and soybeans all in the high to higher range, this is the year to have a crop to sell. The fact that the weather is preventing that crop from getting planted is the cause of anxious impatience among local producers. About the only individuals more nervous about the situation than local farmers are local bankers. On the bright side, at least our farmers know that their bankers are concerned about their health, both physical and financial. The old timers used to say that whatever the weather was like on Memorial Day was a good indicator of what it would be like throughout the rest of the growing season, and every now and then the old timers were right.

Speaking of Memorial Day, Carolyn Christensen, an officer of the Rutland American Legion Auxiliary, says that the holiday will be back to normal in 2022, after 2 years of Covid-19 disruption. In Rutland, Memorial Day observances on the morning of Monday, May 30, will begin with military rites conducted by Bergman-Evenson Post #215 of the American Legion at the Nordland Cemetery, 1½ mile east and ½ mile south of town, followed by military rites at the Rutland Cemetery on the east edge of town at 10:30 a.m. A program produced by the American Legion Auxiliary will be presented at 11:00 a.m. in the Rutland Town Hall, followed by the traditional community pot-luck dinner, also in the Town Hall. Everyone is invited to participate in Memorial Day observances in Rutland on Monday, May 30.

Bruce Burke of Seattle WA stopped in Rutland on the afternoon of Thursday, May 19, doing some research for a personal family history project. Mr. Burke grew up in Breckenridge MN, but the Burke family traces its history back to Rutland and the Great Northern Railway. Bruce’s parents were Harvey & Alice Burke; his grandparents were Rutland natives John & Anna (Spande) Burke; his great-aunt was the late Bertha (Spande) Penfield; and his great-grandparents were Knud & Alisa Spande. Knud & Alisa Spande owned & occupied the house at 309 Gay Street that is now owned by Paul Anderson, from 1918 until Alisa Spande’s death in 1958. The house had been built by Paul’s grandparents, Ole & Julia Anderson, back in 1909. Prior to moving to town, the Spandes had farmed south of Silver Lake. Bruce has a vivid memory of an event that occurred at the Spande house in Rutland back in the early 1950’s, when he was a small boy of about 4 or 5 years of age. It seems that there was an unused water well in the backyard that had been covered over with an old door. Being a boy of some energy, Bruce decided to take a run and jump on the center of that old door. When he did so, the deteriorated boards broke and down went Bruce. Fortunately, as he went through the door he stuck his elbows out and caught himself on the edges of the hole he had made, leaving his head sticking out, above the door, and his feet dangling just above the water in the well. He said that he can still remember looking down and seeing the cold water just beneath his feet. Bruce’s Dad, Harvey Burke, rushed to his assistance and pulled him to safety. Bruce said that he can’t remember just what his Dad said to his great-grandfather about the continued existence of that well, but he’s pretty sure that it was powerful. It had been Bruce’s intention to take a picture of the old well, if any evidence of it still existed. He could not find any trace of the well but was pleased to find that the house is in excellent condition and still looks much as it did back when his great-grandparents first bought it 104 years ago. Mr. Burke had taken the long way around to get to Rutland. He had driven through Washington, Idaho, Utah, Arizona, New Mexico, Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota and Minnesota to get here. He had stopped in New Mexico to take a look at the Air Force Base at which he had been stationed back in the late 60’s, and in Nebraska to visit some students he had taught there back in the 70’s. He was surprised to find that the teen-age students he remembered are now in their 60’s. Time marches on. Mr. Burke was visiting at the home of his cousin, the daughter of the late Jim & Nellie (Burke) McCulloch, at Ottertail Lake MN during his stay in this area. He planned to be heading back to Seattle on Saturday, May 21, and hoped to make it home in 3 or 4 days via I-94 & I-90.

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Hens Do Crow! July 3, 2020

Chuck and Mary Beth Anderson returned last weekend from a quick trip out West with their motorhome accompanied by their daughter, Jennifer, and her husband and their two children. They spent three days camping in Bismarck and touring the Heritage Museum before heading further west to Medora for more camping. While in the area they visited Custer House and On-a-Slant Indian village at Fort Abraham Lincoln and were able to see the 2020 Medora musical. The trip also included a drive down the Enchanted Highway ending at Regent. The Anderson’s do not plan to go far this summer but are taking in different areas of the great State of North Dakota.

The U.S. Census Bureau mailed postcards this week to an estimated 1.3 million post office boxes in communities like Rutland where P.O. boxes are the only mailing address available. The postcards alert households that a census taker may drop off census invitations soon or will visit later to interview them. The postcards also provide information on how to respond to the 2020 Census online or by phone. If you have not completed your Census data, be sure to do it soon. The City of Rutland is in a competition with Forman, Gwinner and Milnor to get the best response rate. The race is getting tighter and the competition continues until July 30. Rutland is lagging and our new Mayor, Michael Mahrer, would appreciate a response as soon as possible so that he does not have to promote the other cities. It is important to be counted. For each person in North Dakota who is not counted, the State will lose $19,100 and the City will also lose State Aid and other funding opportunities. The City Auditor is working on a date for residents to be able to complete the Census online at City Hall within the next few weeks. Watch for details.

The Rutland City Council will meet on Monday, July 6, at 5 p.m. to begin discussion of the 2021 City budget. Other items of business will include selecting a resident to fill the vacant two-year City Council term and to discuss the public works position and how to proceed filling that vacancy. The preliminary budget will be discussed and approved in August with a public hearing on the budget in September.

On Sunday, July 12, Rutland will have a Farmers Market from 5:00 to 6:00 p.m. at the Veterans Memorial Park by City Hall. The Market is open to anyone to come sell and everyone is welcome to come purchase some locally grown produce and/or homemade products. Individuals interested in selling produce or products are asked to contact Katie McLaen at 701-680-9354.

The Rutland Roosters will be wrapping up the 2020 softball season soon so be sure to get out to their next games. On July 21, the Roosters will be playing Milnor at a home game at Sanderson Field and will wrap up the season on July 28 playing in Havana. Games start at 6:45 p.m. so be sure to get your lawn chairs and head out to the old ball game!

That is it for the news from Rutland for this week. Take time and log in to complete your census survey at  https://my2020census.gov/.  If you need help, please do not hesitate to contact the City Auditor at 701-724-3081 to get it done!

The Rooster Crows – August 17, 2018

By Bill Anderson

After a week of what can only be described as oppressively hot and humid weather conditions, relief arrived early on the morning of Tuesday, August 14, in the form of a cold front that swept down from Canada, entered the U. S. free of tariffs, and dropped temperatures from the 90’s to the lower 50’s before the mercury bounced back up into the mid-70’s by mid-afternoon. The hot weather has allowed the wheat harvest to proceed at a rapid pace, with semis hauling wheat to the Wheaton-Dumont Co-op’s Rutland facility in what seems like an endless stream of huge trucks with smiling drivers, and the Co-op’s semis hauling the wheat out to larger, unit train loading facilities about as fast as it comes in. Much of North Dakota’s grain harvest: wheat; corn; and, soybeans; has gone for export, to markets in Asia and Europe, for many years, but America’s withdrawal from the Trans Pacific Partnership, and the escalating trade war with China and the European Union, has resulted in favored treatment in those markets for wheat from traditional competitors, such as Canada, Australia & Argentina, and Chinese domination of a trading bloc on the Pacific rim that was once dominated by the U. S. until early in 2017 when the U. S. pulled the pin and abandoned the field to the competition. North Dakota’s soybean producers are now looking at a potential bumper crop to harvest with a shrinking market into which to sell it. As of Thursday, August 9, according to a member of the North Dakota Soybean Council, there were no orders for North Dakota soybeans at ports on the Pacific coast. “Trade wars are good, and easy to win,” a President once said, but this trade war is starting to look bad for the good guys, and any way you cut it, it’s looking as if North Dakotans are once again being played for suckers by powerful interests, both political and economic, outside the State. Well, election day is coming up. You never know, those North Dakotans just might fool them.

Saturday, August 4, saw a lot of action in Rutland: RLF & MD rummage sale & scalloped Potatoes w/ham dinner at the Town Hall; Sargent Central International Ambassadors of Music Junk-Fest, Farmers Market and dunk tank fund-raiser on Arthur Street; and, the 10th Annual Rutland Rib Fest on Main Street. Following are reports from Pam Maloney, Debbie Banish and Mike Pyle on the day’s activities. From Pam: “We did very well at the rummage sale/dinner. We made $500 on the rummage side & $525 on the dinner. The total of $1025 will be split evenly between Sargent County Relay for Life and the Muscular Dystrophy Association.” From Debbie: “We had 10 junk-Fest vendors and 5 farmers market stands. All five of the music students: Tyler Banish, Eric Bergeman, Ethan Bergeman, Kiauna Bergh, and, Thomas Mehrer took turns getting dunked. Their day started around 7:30 am when they greeted the vendors and helped them set up, as needed. A freewill bucket was set up at the ‘entry’ to the vendor area which was outside, on Arthur Street, between the Erickson Building the Rutland water tower and the Rutland Oil Co. building. The students had fruit trays and water for sale, as well as the metal artwork. Thanks to Rutland Fire Chief Andrew Woytassek and the Rutland-Cayuga Rural Fire District, the dunk tank was set up and filled with water just after noon to give the water time to warm up before the fun began at 4. Each of the kids took a 30-minute shift on the dunk chair. Their time in the tank ended around 7 when others who wanted to donate the $5 could sit in the tank and be dunked. That was a big hit with the younger kids. The students made just over $1,200 from their August 4 effort. The Sargent Central International Ambassadors of Music students and parents also volunteered at the Bobcat employee picnic in Gwinner on Sunday, August 5, to raise more funds to help pay for the trip. They will also be selling the metal artwork and will have a raffle board at Uff-Da Day in Rutland on Sunday, October 7. A freewill supper fund-raiser will be served prior to the Sargent Central One Act Play in November at the Sargent Central Events Center.” From Mike: “There were 5 rib chefs in the competition for the Best Ribs In Rutland title this year: Mahrer Brothers; Hanna Brothers; Digger’s Barbecued Ribs; Little Guy’s; and, Stoke & Smoke. The Best Ribs In Rutland title went to Hanna Brothers this year, the second time they have won the competition in the event’s 10 year history. Second place went to Little Guy’s, in that teams first appearance in Rutland. The judges admitted that all the ribs were delicious, and that their decision was both difficult and delightful. The judges in 2018 were: Arthur Davidson of Rochester MN, Mike’s Dad; Jeremy Becker, formerly of Rutland, now of Rochester MN; and, one surprise, anonymous judge selected from the crowd at the last minute when the regular judge was not able to be here. It’s a tough job, but somebody had to taste all of those ribs. The people judged all of the ribs to be delicious, because all of the rib vendors sold out. The 11th Annual Rutland Rib-Fest is being planned for the same weekend, same location in 2019.” Thanks to Pam, Debbie & Mike for the reports, and for another big day in the little city that can.

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The Rooster Crows – July 13, 2018

By Bill Anderson

Well, here we are: the Summer Solstice, the mid-point of the Solar Year, was 3 weeks ago; June 30, the end of the first half of the calendar year, was 2 weeks ago; and, the 4th of July, Independence Day, the mid-point of Summer vacation, was just a week and a half ago. Only 5 weeks to go until the kids head back to school. Ain’t that a pip!? Sun, rain, wind and heat continue their work, though, no matter what the calendar, or the School Board, says. The thunderstorm that brought rain to this area on the evening of July 2 and morning of Tuesday, July 3, deposited .5 of an inch on Rutland, according to Roger Pearson’s rain gauge, while the gauge of his next-door neighbor, Norbert Kulzer, recorded .6 of an inch. Everything is back to normal. Another rain on the evening of Sunday, July 8, a Thunderstorm that rolled through at about 8:00 p.m. left .2 of an inch in Roger Pearson’s rain gauge and also .2 of an inch next door, at Norbert Kulzer’s.  Jesse Brakke reported .4 of an inch at his farmstead between Rutland & Cayuga, Jim Lunneborg .65 of an inch at his farm in Shuman Township and Rick Bosse .8 of an inch on Sunday evening, and another .18 at about Midnight to bring the total at Brampton to just under an inch. But that’s not all! The next thunder and lightning show started at about 3:00 a.m. on Tuesday, July 10, and dropped about .75 of an inch of rain on Rutland, with more to the west and southwest, as Rick Bosse reported another inch at Brampton and Judee Silseth reported 1.4 inch at the Silseth farm southwest of Silver Lake. Paul Anderson reports that his electronic rain gauge has recorded nearly 10 inches of rain at Rutland since the 1st of June. By contrast, only about 1.5 inch of precipitation was received during the months of April and May. Some wheat fields in the area are beginning to exhibit that greenish, golden hue that indicates the first round of harvest activity may be commencing around the end of July.  The wheat crop looks very good right now, but, as we know, “…it’s never as good as it looks from the road,” and that’s the truth!

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