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Growing Small Towns

Hey, Rutland residents!

We want to hear from YOU!

What do you want for the future of Rutland and Sargent County?

We are excited to be partnering with Growing Small Towns, a new 501(c)(3) located in Oakes to create programs, education, and events to help you and businesses in Sargent County grow.

Will you help us out?

Click this link: Sargent County Survey and tell us what you think!

After you submit your answers—they’re totally anonymous, by the way—share this post on your social media and encourage others to participate!

No matter your age, vocation, or experience, your voice matters.

Thank you for helping us create a brighter future for Rutland and Sargent County.

We are collecting responses through Friday, November 20.

The Rooster Crows 5/29/2020

By Bill Anderson

Although field conditions in the Rutland area are still plenty wet and muddy, there hasn’t been much rain lately. That situation changed, a little, on the morning of Sunday, May 24, when a two-hour .16 of an inch drizzle gave the area a clean-up shower just before Memorial Day. There are no predictions about when the next rainfall might be scheduled, but the old-timers used to say that “Every day that it doesn’t rain is one day closer to the day that it will.” Can’t argue with that.

Memorial Day, Monday, May 25, dawned gray and overcast with a light wind out of the northwest. The air was humid, and the grass was covered with a heavy dew, a reminder of the light rain of the previous day. Despite the fact that the traditional Memorial Day program and pot-luck dinner had been cancelled due to the COVID19 pandemic, a substantial number of current and former Rutland community residents were at both the Nordland and the Rutland cemeteries to witness the members of Bergman-Evenson Post #215 of the American Legion perform military rites honoring the memory of those honored dead who had served in the nation’s military services. Members of the ceremonial detail for 2020 included: Andy Hoflen; Rob Wyum; Ted Lee; Andy Harris; Larry Christensen; Doug Olstad; Roger Pearson; Calvin Jacobson; Doug Spieker; and Bill Anderson. Those who were at the cemeteries commented on the precision of the detail’s performance. Following the military rites at the cemeteries, Post Commander Larry Christensen called a brief meeting in Calvin Jacobson’s driveway at which the members approved a gift to Logan Wyum, SCHS Class of ’20, in appreciation for his services as Post Bugler over the past several years; elected Rob Wyum as Vice-Commander to replace former Vice-Commander and Past 10th District Commander Tom Manley who has moved to New Mexico; and, awarded 50-year membership pins to Vietnam veterans Larry Christensen and Andy Hoflen. With the meeting concluded, those present commemorated the occasion with appropriate beverages served by the host, Sergeant At Arms Calvin Jacobson. A good time was had by all, and justifiably so.

Continue reading “The Rooster Crows 5/29/2020”

2020 Census

The 2020 Census forms have been mailed out to households in Rutland. Please complete your census form as soon as possible. If you need assistance in completing and submitting the form, please contact the Rutland City Auditor at 701-724-3081 and leave a message. It is important for everyone to be counted!

11.7% of Rutland residents have reported as of 11 a.m. today. Let’s get that number higher.

You can check our progress here – select North Dakota and then link on Cities and find Rutland.

Hens Do Crow! Jan. 31, 2020

This is the one of the big weekends in Rutland. Sonja Christensen reported there are now more than 40 teams registered for the Pinochle Tournament on Saturday, February 1. The Rutland Community Club will be serving a noon meal and afternoon snacks. Watch for details next week on the names of the big winners. It is always a fun weekend in Rutland!

The American Legion breakfast slated for Sunday, February 2, has been cancelled so everyone now has a free Sunday to gear up for Superbowl– or for a quiet Sunday evening at home.

The Rutland Blood Drive will be held at the Town Hall on Thursday, February 6, sponsored by the Rutland Community Club. Call Janet Kiefer, Diane Smith or Sheila Wyum to sign up to donate. You can also sign up online at bloodhero.com and use the sponsor code rutland. Walk-ins are welcome so be sure to come on in to donate blood and snack on some have some great homemade treats and beverages after.

Just a reminder that this coming week, on Friday, February 7th, the Rutland Community Club will be hosting the live improv comedy troupe, The LineBenders. The Lariat Bar will sell homemade pizza by the slice and there will be a cash bar. Tickets at the door are $10.00. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. and the show starts at 7:30 p.m. Mark your calendar for a fun night in town!

Valentine’s Day will be here before you know it – so you better plan to treat your sweetheart to an afternoon or evening out that Friday.  St. Mary’s Church in Forman will be holding their annual Valentine Luncheon on the 14th at the Parish Center from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.  The price is $8.00. They will be serving open-faced sandwiches, salads, desserts, coffee and punch and there will also be door prizes.

That’s it for this week from Rutland. The Rutland City Council will hold its next meeting on Monday, February 3, at 5:00 p.m. and the Rutland Community Club will meet on Monday, February 10. Check out other upcoming events in Rutland on the City website at www.rutlandnd.com. There are some fun events in March including the Sportsman’s Club Fish Fry on the 6th and the Rutland Community Club Fun Night on March 15th.

The Rooster Crows – December 27, 2019

By Bill Anderson

Mother Nature bestowed an early Christmas present on Rutland and vicinity by pushing the temperature into the upper 30’s, nearly to 40 degrees, on the first 2 days of Winter, Saturday, December 21 and Sunday, December 22. The forecast for the rest of the week is for a little cooler weather, but nothing that could be categorized as unbearable. There is still enough snow for Santa’s sleigh, and that’s what counts.

Shawn Klein, Manager of the Sargent County Bank’s Rutland Station, hosted a Christmas Open House for Bank Patrons on Friday, December 13. Shawn served coffee, hot cider and an assortment of cookies to those who stopped in. Bank patrons also participated in a door prize drawing during the open house. Door prize winners were: Karla Breker; Vern Liest; Jim Lunneborg; Lyle Erickson; Mary Ann Levery; & Dave Bladow. Shawn, as well as the Bank’s management & staff, extends best wishes for a Merry Christmas and a Happy, Healthy & Prosperous New Year to the Bank’s many customers in the Rutland community.

Rutland Postmaster Lori McLaen also treated patrons of the local Post Office to a Christmas Open House on Wednesday, December 18. Patrons who stopped in were treated to Christmas cookies, punch and a big “Merry Christmas” from Lori. Although the U. S. Postal Service is currently running an advertising campaign touting as one of its benefits that “You’ll never have to go to the Post Office again,” here in Rutland a visit to the Post Office is a rather pleasant experience that folks here don’t mind at all.

Continue reading “The Rooster Crows – December 27, 2019”

Waiting for the Train

By Bill Anderson

Written December 20, 1999; Revised December 23, 2019

When we were kids, back in the early 1950’s, growing up in a small town in southeastern North Dakota, the rhythm of our lives was governed, to a large extent, by the schedule of the Great Northern Railway Company. Our father, Earl Anderson, was the station agent/telegrapher for the Great Northern in our hometown of Rutland, North Dakota. His schedule was set by the Great Northern and our schedule was set by him. Back then railroad trains ran on schedules, with arrival and departure times calculated down to the minute. Tough conductors like Shag Lehmann and Herb Cochrane would cuss a blue streak if their train arrived in the station as little as a minute or 2 ahead or behind the scheduled time, and woe be unto the locomotive engineer or brakeman who was responsible for the deviation. Back in 1951, you could tell what time it was by the freight train steam whistle or the passenger train air horn as it came into town or departed with a load of freight, passengers, cream cans and U. S. mail. It’s not that way anymore. Now, a person can’t even determine the time of the year by the arrival or departure of trains on the Rutland branch line. As the late Ahrlin Hoffman commented some years ago, “I used to set my watch by the old Great Northern, then, one day, I came into town and discovered I was two months late.”

Back in the 1940’s and 1950’s the trains ran on schedule every day, holidays being no exception, and the men who worked for the railroad were on duty whenever the company said they were needed. As the railroad’s agent and telegrapher, Dad had to be at the depot when trains were scheduled to arrive. Everybody knew the train schedule and, a lot of times, folks would go down to the depot in the evening to “meet the passenger train” just to see who got on and who got off. The arrival of the eastbound evening passenger train from Aberdeen was always looked forward to with anticipation. Everything from freight to passengers to postcards moved by rail in those days, and folks were always looking forward to either sending or receiving something. You could drop an envelope containing your order to the Sears Roebuck or Montgomery Ward Companies into the slot on the side of the eastbound passenger train’s Railway Post Office car on Tuesday evening, and expect the items you had ordered to arrive with the U.S. Mail on Thursday morning. All it took to send a First Class letter back then was a 3 cent stamp. Is today’s internet service any better than that? It’s certainly not any easier.

Continue reading “Waiting for the Train”