Seize the Day! September 3, 2021

For more information contact:   Cindy Klapperich cindy.klapperich@ndsu.edu 701-824-3355

SEIZE THE DAY!  (For publication in The Sargent County Teller,  09/03/2021 issue.)

Planning Ahead, Looking Forward and Gearing Up

During my junior and senior years in high school, I was a member of the Future Homemakers of America (FHA).  At that time, the student organization was tied to Home Economics classes.  Since then, Home Economics has become known as Family and Consumer Sciences, and FHA has become FCCLA (Family, Career and Community Leaders of America).

One of the biggest lessons I learned while in FHA was the value and importance of planning.  In fact, we used a process, known as the IMPACT process, to navigate the steps in the planning process.  IMPACT was an acronym for “I Make Plans And Carry Through.”

At this time, I am in the midst of planning and preparing for fall/winter activities.  Three of them are:

  • High Tunnel Workshop.   This September 21 workshop is an undertaking of the Wild Rice Soil Conservation District.  It will include mini-sessions on FSA and NRCS programs, Pest Management, Micro-Irrigation and Rainfall Collection for High Tunnels, CSA Production, Marketing and Sales, and Using & Marketing Fresh Produce.  For more information contact Matt Olson at the Wild Rice SCD office by calling 701-724-6226 or visiting the website at www.wildricescd.com.
  • Lead Local.  This training will engage participants in activities designed to help them develop and maximize their skills for working effectively with people in groups and organizations, at work and at home.  The highly interactive training has been proven to be of great benefit for new, seasoned, and aspiring members of councils, boards and committees.  Registration is open until September 14, and the workshop is scheduled to be held on Tuesday, September 28.  For more information or to register, visit https://www.ndsu.edu/agriculture/extension/county-extension-offices/sargent-county, or contact NDSU Extension by calling 701-724-3355 or emailing cindy.klapperich@ndsu.edu.
  • Powerful Tools for Caregivers.   This online course is scheduled to begin December 1.  Registration is open until November 17.  The course is designed to help caregivers gain skills to help themselves thrive, not just survive.  It is based on the premise that when caregivers take good care of themselves, everyone benefits.  Participants will learn strategies to reduce stress, increase self-confidence and the ability to make difficult decisions, and create life balance.  They will also increase their ability to communicate clearly, especially when strong feelings or emotions are present.  For more information or to register, visit https://www.ndsu.edu/agriculture/extension/county-extension-offices/sargent-county, or contact NDSU Extension by calling 701-724-3355 or emailing cindy.klapperich@ndsu.edu.

Some of the other upcoming opportunities are listed below.  Call NDSU Extension (701-724-3355) or email cindy.klapperich@ndsu.edu for more information about any of them.

  • Building Tomorrow’s Leaders classes (starting Sept. 13)
  • High Tunnel Workshop (September 21)
  • Lead Local (September 28)
  • Sargent County 4-H Council (September 30)
  • National 4-H Week (October 3-9)
  • Sargent County 4-H Leader Meeting (October 4)
  • Multi-county 4-H Volunteer Project Training in Jamestown (November 10)
  • Sargent County 4-H Family Fun Night and Awards Event (November 21)
  • Powerful Tools for Caregivers online class (starts December 1)
  • NDSU/Sargent County Extension Advisory Council meeting (December date TBD)

Seize the Day! Unchecked Stress

By Cindy Klapperich, NDSU Extension – Sargent County

SEIZE THE DAY!  (For publication in The Sargent County Teller,  May 21, 2021 issue.)

Consequences of Stress Going Unchecked

Stress is definitely one of the things that we need to “take care of” sooner, rather than later.  Like an untreated wound, when stress is ignored, it can quickly worsen.  The results of not taking action to reduce stress can be nasty:

  • Health challenges
  • Compromised relationships
  • Physical and emotional exhaustion
  • Depression

Unchecked, stress can wreak havoc on our health because of its negative impact on our immune system.  When our immune system is down, we are more vulnerable to illness, and pre-existing medical conditions can worsen.

When stress escalates, emotions such as irritability and anger can flare up, causing relationships to suffer.  Relationships also suffer when communication shuts down as a casualty of stress.

If stress consumes physical and emotional energy to the point of exhaustion, feelings of being overwhelmed and unable to cope can result, causing what is commonly referred to as “burnout.”

To manage stress effectively:

Continue reading “Seize the Day! Unchecked Stress”

The Rooster Crows – June 4, 2021

By Bill Anderson

Thursday, May 27, was a cold and somber day, with a high temperature of 49 degrees and intermittent rain showers, probably better described as a steady, misty drizzle accompanied by occasional bouts of real rain,  throughout the day. Rainfall varied from .5 of an inch in Roger Pearson’s rain gauge to .6 of an inch in everybody elses’s gauges, from Rick Bosse at Brampton to Roger McLaen at Forman to Jesse Brakke at rural Rutland and Kurt Breker at Cayuga. It was a good rain, that came slow enough to soak in and do some good where it fell.  Since then, the temperature has been on the rise, and the forecast for the coming weekend is for temperatures at or near 100 above, accompanied by wind that will put some stress on the newly emerging corn and soybean crops.  Well, if they’re going to live in North Dakota, they had better be tough. 

The Rutland-Cayuga Fire Department was called out on the morning of Monday, May 24, to assist the Forman-Havana Fire Department with a fire at the Aberle farmstead in Dunbar Township, northeast of Forman.  According to reports, a shift in the wind direction, accompanied by an increase in velocity, had blown embers from a burn pit into the dry grass in the farm’s tree belt. The firefighters were successful in extinguishing the flames before any structures on the farm were damaged. Way to go firemen!

Congregate dining at the Rutland Seniors’ Center resumed on Tuesday, May 25, after a 14 month hiatus due to the covid-19 pandemic. Special guest for the first dinner of Salisbury steak, mashed potatoes and home-grown asparagus was Ransom-Sargent Seniors’ Services Director Morgan Biss from the Lisbon office.  Ten seniors were present for dinner, and several Meals On Wheels were also delivered. Head chef Janny Kiefer said that it was good to be getting back to normal.

Continue reading “The Rooster Crows – June 4, 2021”

Seize the Day!

For more information contact:   Cindy Klapperich, cindy.klapperich@ndsu.edu

                                         

SEIZE THE DAY!  (Published in The Sargent County Teller,  04.23.21/2021 issue.)

Nothing Says Spring Like this Veggie

What veggie can be eaten raw, grilled, steamed or roasted, is fairly hardy and can grow wild among grass, and when eaten raw has a taste similar to fresh garden peas?  If you guessed asparagus, you’re right!  It is a vegetable that just seems to shout “spring,” right?

The NDSU Extension Family and Community Wellness agent in Cavalier county, Katie Henry, is a friend and colleague who tells the story of an asparagus “farm” that grew along a shelter belt that was just down the road from where she lived as a child.  As she tells it, people could go pick all of the asparagus they wanted and leave their money in a little cash box under the tree at the end by the road, on the honor system.  She considered it to be a fun adventure to go asparagus hunting among the grass when she was a youngster. 

Asparagus may be harvested from about mid-May until the third week in June, beginning in its third or fourth season of growth, not earlier.  The shoots are best cut when 6-10 inches tall.  If they get taller than that, they tend to be “woody.”  New shoots may be cut as often as every other day if temperatures and moisture conditions are favorable.

Asparagus should not be harvested any later than the third week of June so that the plant can rejuvenate itself for the next year.  Asparagus plants, once established, can produce for up to 20 years.

To harvest asparagus, push a knife into the soil close to the shoot, cutting it slightly below the soil surface, or simply snap the shoot off with your fingers.  As with all fresh fruits and vegetables, be sure to rinse with clear running water and a slight amount of friction before eating it or preparing it for a recipe.

Continue reading “Seize the Day!”

Caring for Others and Taking Care of Ourselves

NDSU › NDSU Extension – Sargent County › Seize the Day Blog 

Do you know someone who calls or checks in on a family member or neighbor several times a week or every day just to make sure they are OK?

Do you know someone who helps a family member or neighbor by doing errands or in-home tasks for them, or by preparing meals for them? Or someone who is parent and caregiver for their child who has special needs?

Do you know someone who helps a family member or neighbor by setting up their medications for them, or by taking them to appointments, or by assisting them with finances or personal cares?

If so, you know a caregiver.

Caregivers do those sorts of things, and more, whether it be in-house, locally, or from a distance of miles away. The person on the receiving end of their care may be a parent, a spouse, a child with special needs, another relative or a neighbor.

Being a caregiver can be very rewarding. It can also be very stressful. It can take a physical and emotional toll, and “burnout” can happen. 

For those reasons, it’s important for the caregiver to also be caring for himself or herself while caring for and helping others. That’s exactly what they learn to do when they participate in “Powerful Tools for Caregivers.”

“Powerful Tools for Caregivers” is a free online class that two of my colleagues and I are offering to address those needs. The afternoon online class starts May 11. Class participants will learn valuable self-care skills such as how to reduce stress, increase self-confidence, communicate feelings, balance their lives, increase their ability to make tough decisions and locate reliable helpful resources.

Interested persons are encouraged to register as soon as possible or by April 30 so that preparations can be made. To register online for the class, go to https://ndc3.org/Classes/Register/126. If you need or want more information or have questions about the class, contact Cindy at cindy.klapperich@ndsu.edu or by calling 701-724-3355.