The Rooster Crows – Nov. 19, 2021

By Bill Anderson

Mother Nature gave Rutland a shot of rain on Wednesday, November 10, that coated streets and sidewalks with a sheet of ice, and then followed up with some big, fluffy snowflakes to create a slushy, mushy, slippery mess. The rainfall measured .25 of an inch of rain according to the electronic gauges at the Chuck & Mary Beth Anderson farm 6½ miles southwest of Rutland and the Mike & Debbie Banish farm 2 miles south of town. According to The Assembled Wise Men, there was about 2 inches of snow from the flurries on Thursday, Friday & Saturday. Fierce winds, gusting up to 60 mph, on the night of Thursday, November 11, raised concerns, but everything seemed to be intact when the big blow subsided on Friday. A sunny day on Monday, the 15th, and a temperature in the mid-40’s on Tuesday, the 16th, cleared out most of last week’s ice & snow, making room for the next blast that’s sure to come. A new blast of wind was tearing at the countryside on the morning of Wednesday, November 17, and chuck Anderson said that the anemometer on his electronic weather station indicated gusts up to 37 mph by 9:00 a.m. The wind was out of the west, so, if it doesn’t relocate us to Minnesota, we’ll report further next week.

Rutland native Janelle Brakke reports that she has moved from the South Fargo apartment which has been her home for the past 9 years to a townhouse on 39th Avenue South in Fargo, a few blocks west of 45th Street. According to Janelle, the townhouse complex in which her new home is situated was originally constructed in the 1970’s, but it has been well maintained and was recently thoroughly renovated. The townhouse is considerably larger than her old apartment and, best of all, it has an attached garage. Janelle is an RN, and is employed by Clay County Public Health in Moorhead.

Rodney Erickson reports that harvest activity in the Rutland area wrapped up last week, and that the final loads of corn from the 2021 crop were hauled in to the Rutland Elevator on the evening of Tuesday, November 9, just before the rain started. The best that can be said for the 2021 corn and soybean crops in this area is that neither was as bad as anticipated, and that both were better than expected. As the late Dave Hoflen of this community often observed, “There have been 2 good years in North Dakota, 1914 and next year.” Hope springs eternal, and there’s better times a’comin’!

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Hens Do Crow! Nov. 15, 2019

By Deborah Banish and Bill Anderson

Paul Anderson departed Rutland on Thursday, October 31, bound for Punkin Center AZ via Fargo ND, Minneapolis MN, Phoenix AZ & Sun City West AZ. Paul visited at the Sun City West home of his mother-in-law, Etha Quinlan, on Friday & Saturday, November 1 & 2, before heading out for Punkin Center and the 45th Annual Arizona Hunt Club Quail Hunt from Sunday, November 3 to Friday, November 8. At the conclusion of the hunt, Paul retraced his steps and arrived back in Rutland on the evening of Saturday, November 9. At Punkin Center a dozen more members of the Arizona Hunt Club joined Paul for some long walks in the sun and some great campfire cooking. Among the North Dakota natives participating in this year’s gathering were: Cavalier ND native Lynn Hartje, now a resident of Punkin Center; Cayuga native Don Isensee, now a resident of Perham MN; Rutland native Bill Anderson, still at Rutland; Stanley ND native Don Hynek, now residing at Ventura CA; Cavalier ND native Rodger Kemp, now a resident of Minneapolis MN and Tucson AZ; and, Elgin ND native Barton Thompson, now a resident of Flagstaff AZ. Over the years other friends have been adopted into the group, and its members now span the continent, from Virginia to California. As many of the members of the group are military veterans, the final evening campfire of the gathering includes appropriate beverages and toasts to the health of the Army, Navy, Air Force & Marines, as well as the singing of the Marine Corps Hymn by all present. All in all, a good time was had by all, and justifiably so.

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The Rooster Crows – 9/20/19

By Bill Anderson

Although there hasn’t been a lot of talk about hunting so far, the early season on Giant Canada Geese opened on August 15 and closed on September 15; the mourning dove season opened on Labor Day weekend; and, the archery season for deer opened on Labor Day weekend, too. There is probably no experience more memorable in a young hunter’s lifetime than taking his first deer with bow and arrow. Rutland native Dan Narum, now a North Dakota District Court Judge residing in Lamoure, recently provided the following report on the first successful archery hunt by his son, Asher.

Asher is now 10 years old. This year was his third year deer hunting with his bow. He has hunted western North Dakota in my company during the last two years and has been fortunate to get three chances at mule deer bucks out there. But buck fever affected his shots each time. Fortunately, they were all clean misses. This year we decided that we would try to get his first deer on our land at Lake LaMoure. Since long before he was born I have been preparing the land as prime wildlife habitat for him to hunt. I have planted hundreds of trees and managed the grass. I have not even harvested a deer on the property. This year on opening day Asher, his classmate Owen Peterson and I set out for the blind as soon as school was out for the day. The boys were pretty slow to settle in to hunt and it took about an hour to get them to be quiet enough for any deer to come by our blind. Once the boys settled in to hunting, though, the deer started to come. After about two hours a lone doe came by and presented a 15-yard shot. Asher made a near perfect shot and the arrow passed clean through the vitals. We were able to watch the deer move off and lie down. The most difficult time for me was managing to keep the boys in the blind for an hour after the shot. Asher has hunted with me in New Mexico, the North Dakota bad lands and many areas in Dickey, LaMoure and Ransom counties. For him to take his first deer on our land means a lot to me. Someday it will also mean a lot to him. With Asher’s bow season done, the following morning I travel to Lonetree Wildlife Management Area near Harvey. I am serving as a mentor for a youth rifle deer hunt through the North Dakota Game and Fish Department. Through the hunters education program we find kids who don’t have an adult to take them hunting and provide them an opportunity to spend a day learning about hunting, and then we take them out to experience real hunting. This is my third year participating in the mentored hunt. It’s been a very rewarding experience.

Thanks to Dan for the report, and congratulations to Asher on a successful hunt in the company of his Dad and his best friend. It doesn’t get any better than that!

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Hens Do Crow – March 1, 2019

By Deborah Banish

Mother Nature has not been playing nice lately and I know I am getting tired of the snow. The snowfall and ground blizzard on February 24th resulted in some area events being postponed or cancelled. The Rutland Community Club Fun Night has been rescheduled for Sunday, March 10, same time (4-6 p.m.) at the Rutland Hall. The Rutland Sportsman’s Club cancelled the Fishing Derby at Silver Lake but the Club’s drawing will be held once all the sold tickets are received. The next snow event that is predicted for Friday, March 1, is the date of the Rutland Sportsman’s Club Fish Fry but that won’t stop this event from happening. The Sargent Central Clay Target League members will be holding their bake sale fundraiser that evening so be sure to head in early. Serving starts at 5:30 p.m.

The Rutland Community Development Corporation (RCDC) had to postpone their January 30th meeting to February 20th at the Rutland Senior Center. Several members attended but, due to weather, the turnout was less than planned. The Lariat Bar is current on the loan payments with the RCDC and those are the only two loans out at this time. The RCDC has money that is available to be invested in the community if any individual or entity is interested in establishing a business in town. Calvin Jacobson and Jake Erickson were both elected to another term on the RCDC Board and Cam Gulleson was elected to fill the remaining two-years of the term held by Sam Gillespie.

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The Rooster Crows – January 25, 2019

By Bill Anderson

One week to go until Ground Hog’s Day, and a chance to break Winter’s tyrannical grasp on a people who will be neither bowed nor cowed, although they may, occasionally, have to be towed. We are now at that stage of the Winter in which it has ceased to be interesting or entertaining, and has become a brutal burden, to be endured, outlasted and overcome. Adversity does create opportunity, though, and men of ambition, such as Dave Young, Jim Brown and Larry Christensen, have shown that even winter’s bleak cloud brings with it the silver lining of polished and shiny snow shovels. Bitter cold and the sharp sting of snow driven by fierce winds cannot stay these stalwart yeomen from the efficient completion of their appointed snow removal duties. 

On Tuesday, January 22, Sonja Christensen, one of the co-chairpersons of the 24th Annual Rudy Anderson Memorial Pinochle Tournament, reported that 57 teams of pinochle enthusiasts had preregistered to play their favorite game of skill on Saturday, February 2, in the Rutland Town Hall, and that there is still room for a few more teams. The tournament is sponsored by the Rutland Community Club, which will also serve morning and afternoon lunches, as well as a Noon dinner, to tournament participants and to the public. For more information about registering to compete in the pinochle tournament, give Sonja a call at 701-899-1463.

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The Rooster Crows – September 21, 2018

By Bill Anderson

Summer 2018 left in a huff between sundown on Sunday, September 16, and sunrise on Monday, September 17. At 5:00 p.m. on Sunday afternoon the temperature registered 93 degrees on a south wind gusting up to 45 mph. By 5:00 a.m. on Monday, September 17, the thermometer registered 48 degrees, accompanied by a 20 mph wind out of the north. A drop of 45 degrees in a span of 12 hours. What a difference a day makes! From wind burn to wind chill in 12 hours. The change in the weather also brought with it a few showers of rain, but not enough to get a reading in any of the local rain gauges. According to information obtained from the internet (and that’s always correct, right?) the Autumnal Equinox will occur on September 22 this year, and astronomers declare the Equinox to be the end of Summer and the beginning of Autumn. However, there is controversy in the scientific community even about the beginnings and the ends of the 4 seasons. Meteorologists use the Gregorian calendar, the one we all use today, to divide the year into 4 seasons, each 3 months in length, and, as far as the meteorologists are concerned, Autumn began back on September 1. So, are the astronomers correct, or are the meteorologists correct? The answer is: YES! At least the meteorologists are consistent. For them, Autumn always starts on September 1 each and every year, but, philosophers say that consistency is “the hobgoblin of small minds,” so being consistent may not be all that it’s cracked up to be. Astronomers, however, can’t quite pin down a date. They say that, depending on the year, the Earth’s orbit around the Sun, and several other factors, the Autumnal Equinox can occur, and Autumn begin, sometime between September 21 and September 24. So much for the precision of science! Both meteorologists and astronomers agree that after September 22 we will definitely be in the season of Autumn. That’s where the agreement ends, though, as the meteorologists claim that Autumn will end on November 30 and astronomers say that the Winter Solstice marking the end of Autumn and the beginning of Winter will occur on December 22. According to the President, the entire discussion is all part of a plot to take the spotlight away from him, and get people thinking about less significant personages, such as God. Could be.

Curt & Renee Larson arrived home on Wednesday, September 5, at the conclusion of a 3-week trip to Europe that had begun on August 14. Their first stop was Amsterdam, where they boarded one of Viking River Cruises riverboats for a journey up the Rhine River to Basil, Switzerland. In Switzerland they rented a car and drove to Frankfort, Germany, where they stayed with a friend who had been a foreign exchange student in the Larsons’ home a number of years ago, and who is now a Doctor practicing Psychiatry in Frankfort. “No comment,” said Curt. They next traveled to Norway to visit cousins of the Larson and Seavert families, and then on to Sweden where they discovered that Renee’s Swedish forebears had been Jonssons in Sweden and that they had taken the Sundquist name, derived from the name of their farm in Sweden, on their arrival in America. It was a great trip, but tiring, according to Curt, and, as with most trips, the best part was arriving back home.

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