Hens Do Crow! Oct. 25, 2019

By Deborah Banish – and Bill Anderson

The Rutland Center Hall kitchen was a busy place on Wednesday, October 16, when ten women gathered to prepare freezer meals. This was the first of two Wednesday-night sessions under the guidance of Katie McLaen, President of the Rutland Community Club (RCC). The RCC has been sponsoring this event for several years. The final session was held Wednesday, October 23. If you missed it this year, be sure to watch for information next year right after Uffda Day.

Workers from Buskohl Construction of Milnor and from Dakota Design Landscaping of Wahpeton took advantage of pleasant weather to work at straightening, reinforcing and improving the appearance of the front porch at 217 First Street on Friday, October 18. The men from Buskohl Construction straightened a sag in the porch floor and installed bracing to keep it straight, while the Dakota landscaping crew placed landscape fabric beneath the porch to deter the growth of weeds and enhanced the appearance of the front of the house by installing lattice work around the base of the porch. The house, built in 1902 by pioneer Rutland businessman C. E. Johnson, is once again a showpiece on Rutland’s Main Street. It is currently owned by Bill Anderson and Kathy Brakke of this community.

The Rutland American Legion served up another fantastic pancake breakfast on Sunday, October 20. Fresh pancakes, eggs, sausage and orange juice was provided for a free-will donation. The Rutland American Legion Auxiliary members helped cook the pancakes and eggs and also held a free-will bake sale. A big thank you is extended to everyone who attended the event this year.

Nine members of the Rutland Raiders 4-H Club went door-knocking in Rutland on Sunday, October 20, to collect for the Sargent County Food Pantry. The Club extends a big thank-you to everyone who contributed food and cash donations for the Food Pantry.

The Rutland City Auditor will be contacting area residents to serve on the Census Committee known as the Sargent County Complete Count Committee. Members will be required to attend training on November 6th (Wednesday) from 5:30-7:30 p.m. at the Gwinner Community Center. From January- April 2020 members will get the word out, plan local events, and meet every two weeks to a month until May 2020. Recruitment will begin soon as there has been no response to the “call” for volunteers. Please say “yes” when you get the call. It is important to get every resident of Rutland counted on the next census!

North Dakota’s Governor declared a Statewide Flood Disaster Emergency on Monday, October 21, as a steady rain dumped another 1.5 inch of precipitation on Rutland and vicinity. Water levels in the Wild Rice River and in many of the large sloughs in the area are as high, or higher, than they were during the flood disaster years of 2009, ’10 and ’11, and several Township and County roads are once again under water. It was noted that those formerly annual problem areas that were improved with the help of an 80% funding grant from the Federal Highway Administration back in 2013 are high and dry during the current flooding but would all be under water if the improvements had not been made 6 years ago. Sometimes spending money saves money, and those road improvements are an example of the truth of that axiom. The western portion of Sargent County is currently dealing with more water problems than is the east, but the excess water is adversely impacting the entire County, according to County Emergency Manager Wendy Willprecht. The Sargent County Emergency Manager’s Office; the Sargent County NDSU Extension Service Office; and, the Sargent County Public Health District; are currently assisting local units of government, farmers & ranchers and homeowners deal with the consequences of the high water. For the County Emergency Manager call 724-6241, Extension 113; for the Extension Service call 724-3355; and, for the County Health District call 724-3725. Reports are that Lenny Runyan, who resides on the old Maly farm at the top of the hills south of Rutland, has placed an order for a shipment of gopher wood, and will commence construction of an ark as soon as it arrives.

On Sunday, October 27, 2:00 p.m., the Rutland American Legion Auxiliary will “Trick or Treat” for gently used clothing (male or female), toiletries and personal care items and cash donations. Items will be donated to the Gladys Ray Shelter in Fargo.

Upcoming Rutland events: Sunday, October 27, 2 p.m. the Sargent County Farmers Union Annual Meeting in the Rutland Senior Center; Sunday, November 3, 5 p.m. the first session of Zumba will be held in Rutland City Hall sponsored by the RCC (held the first Sunday of each month); Monday, November 4, 5 p.m. Rutland City Council meeting; Monday, November 11, 5 p.m., Rutland Community Club; Saturday, December 14, Santa Day sponsored by the Rutland Community Club. Be sure to check the Rutland website for upcoming events.

That’s it from Rutland this week. Be sure to follow us on Facebook and on the Rutland blog. Keep up with events and announcements on the rutlandnd.com website and share your events by sending an email to rutlandnd@drtel.net. Later.

Hens Do Crow! Sept. 27, 2019

By Deborah Banish

Travis Tischer and a crew of workmen from Dakota Designs of Wahpeton were in Rutland on the afternoon of Thursday, September 19, performing some touch-up work on the landscaping at 217 First Street, also known as The Old Parsonage. The crew sowed some additional grass seed on a few bare spots in the lawn and added some mulch to the base of the trees that had been planted two weeks earlier, back on September 5. Before arriving in Rutland, Mr. Tischer’s crew had planted 15 trees at a farmstead west of Delamere and had done some landscaping work on the school playground at North Sargent in Gwinner. After completing their project at The Old Parsonage their next stop was at the Steve & Sheila Wyum farmstead northeast of Rutland where they had 2 new trees to plant. The company’s e-mail address is dakotadesignsnd@gmail.com.

The cool Summer has lengthened out the number of days needed to get the 2019 corn crop to maturity, and is reportedly causing some concerns in the commodity markets. According to Lyle Erickson, grain traders are worried that the 2019 crop will be short because of all the farmers who are pulling cobs off the stalks to check the maturity of the kernels. Lyle made this report just before church on Sunday morning, so it must be true, although it’s not so true that the price has improved any.

Continue reading “Hens Do Crow! Sept. 27, 2019”

The Rooster Crows – 9/20/19

By Bill Anderson

Although there hasn’t been a lot of talk about hunting so far, the early season on Giant Canada Geese opened on August 15 and closed on September 15; the mourning dove season opened on Labor Day weekend; and, the archery season for deer opened on Labor Day weekend, too. There is probably no experience more memorable in a young hunter’s lifetime than taking his first deer with bow and arrow. Rutland native Dan Narum, now a North Dakota District Court Judge residing in Lamoure, recently provided the following report on the first successful archery hunt by his son, Asher.

Asher is now 10 years old. This year was his third year deer hunting with his bow. He has hunted western North Dakota in my company during the last two years and has been fortunate to get three chances at mule deer bucks out there. But buck fever affected his shots each time. Fortunately, they were all clean misses. This year we decided that we would try to get his first deer on our land at Lake LaMoure. Since long before he was born I have been preparing the land as prime wildlife habitat for him to hunt. I have planted hundreds of trees and managed the grass. I have not even harvested a deer on the property. This year on opening day Asher, his classmate Owen Peterson and I set out for the blind as soon as school was out for the day. The boys were pretty slow to settle in to hunt and it took about an hour to get them to be quiet enough for any deer to come by our blind. Once the boys settled in to hunting, though, the deer started to come. After about two hours a lone doe came by and presented a 15-yard shot. Asher made a near perfect shot and the arrow passed clean through the vitals. We were able to watch the deer move off and lie down. The most difficult time for me was managing to keep the boys in the blind for an hour after the shot. Asher has hunted with me in New Mexico, the North Dakota bad lands and many areas in Dickey, LaMoure and Ransom counties. For him to take his first deer on our land means a lot to me. Someday it will also mean a lot to him. With Asher’s bow season done, the following morning I travel to Lonetree Wildlife Management Area near Harvey. I am serving as a mentor for a youth rifle deer hunt through the North Dakota Game and Fish Department. Through the hunters education program we find kids who don’t have an adult to take them hunting and provide them an opportunity to spend a day learning about hunting, and then we take them out to experience real hunting. This is my third year participating in the mentored hunt. It’s been a very rewarding experience.

Thanks to Dan for the report, and congratulations to Asher on a successful hunt in the company of his Dad and his best friend. It doesn’t get any better than that!

Continue reading “The Rooster Crows – 9/20/19”

Hens Do Crow – March 1, 2019

By Deborah Banish

Mother Nature has not been playing nice lately and I know I am getting tired of the snow. The snowfall and ground blizzard on February 24th resulted in some area events being postponed or cancelled. The Rutland Community Club Fun Night has been rescheduled for Sunday, March 10, same time (4-6 p.m.) at the Rutland Hall. The Rutland Sportsman’s Club cancelled the Fishing Derby at Silver Lake but the Club’s drawing will be held once all the sold tickets are received. The next snow event that is predicted for Friday, March 1, is the date of the Rutland Sportsman’s Club Fish Fry but that won’t stop this event from happening. The Sargent Central Clay Target League members will be holding their bake sale fundraiser that evening so be sure to head in early. Serving starts at 5:30 p.m.

The Rutland Community Development Corporation (RCDC) had to postpone their January 30th meeting to February 20th at the Rutland Senior Center. Several members attended but, due to weather, the turnout was less than planned. The Lariat Bar is current on the loan payments with the RCDC and those are the only two loans out at this time. The RCDC has money that is available to be invested in the community if any individual or entity is interested in establishing a business in town. Calvin Jacobson and Jake Erickson were both elected to another term on the RCDC Board and Cam Gulleson was elected to fill the remaining two-years of the term held by Sam Gillespie.

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The Rooster Crows – December 21, 2018

By Bill Anderson

Winter arrives on Friday, December 21, but the December Thaw has loosened Winter’s icy grasp for the past week and a half, pushing daytime highs into the mid-40’s while clearing streets of ice and snow. The mild temperatures have allowed harvest activities to move at a rapid pace, and some local producers, including the Pherson Farm which harvests its own crops as well as doing custom harvest work for others, finished up the corn harvest at the first of the week. Due to the drawn-out pace of the harvest this year the transportation system has been able to keep up, and, even though the 2018 corn and soybean crops have been among the largest in history, there has been no need to pile corn or beans in giant, golden mountains on the ground as in the past several harvests. With the 2018 crop records now in the history books, preparations for 2019 have already begun. There is some conjecture that buckwheat and spelts may make a comeback, but seed orders for those crops are light, so far.

The members of Rutland’s Bergman-Evenson Post #215 of The American Legion met at 3:00 p.m. on Wednesday, December 12, in the dining room of the Lariat Bar. The Adjutant’s report showed $3,868.00 available for the Post’s activities in the community. Members decided to make a $250.00 contribution to the Sargent Central students raising money to participate in the International Ambassadors of Music tour of Europe in the Summer of 2019. The members also discussed the Super Bowl Sunday breakfast/brunch on February 3, 2019, and decided to serve eggs, biscuits & gravy for the event. The Legion Auxiliary is also expected to have a sale of baked goods that same morning. Raffle tickets were distributed for a raffle in which an 8: power ice auger will be the prize. The price of the tickets is $1.00 apiece or 6 for $5.00. The drawing will be held on Sunday, February 3, in the Rutland Town Hall. The next meeting of Bergman-Evenson Post #215 will be during the month of January, at the call of the Commander. Officers of the Post are: Commander, Larry Christensen; Vice-Commander, Tom Manley; Adjutant, Doug Olstad; Chaplain, Ted Lee; and, Sergeant At Arms, Calvin Jacobson.

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The Rooster Crows – November 9, 2018

By Bill Anderson

Snow, wind & cold, those dreaded 4 letter words, hit with certainty on the evening of Election Day, Tuesday, November 6, and the following morning. An inch of snow, a 19-degree temperature and a 5-degree wind chill on Wednesday morning left no doubt that Old Man Winter is well armed for the season. The cold, wet weather has again delayed completion of harvest activities for many farmers, but some are getting close to the finish line. Colin Sundquist reported that 35 acres of soybeans remained to be harvested on the Sundquist farm north of Forman as of Sunday, November 4, and Mike Walstead reported that the soybean harvest had been completed and only 100 acres of corn remained to be threshed out on his Rutland Township farm as of Tuesday, November 6. Mike stated that the 2018 yields were the best he has seen since he started farming nearly 40 years ago. He didn’t want to boast, but if someone accused him of a soybean average of over 50 and a corn average of more than 200, he would have to plead “guilty!” He only wishes that he could plead guilty to $12 beans and $5 corn, and he would gladly accept his sentence with no remorse at all.

Harvey Bergstrom reports that he and Judy were at the Clarion Hotel in Minot on Saturday, November 3, to attend a meeting and banquet sponsored by the Farm Rescue organization. Harvey had suffered a heart attack a year ago, and Farm Rescue stepped in to help get his 900 acres of soybeans planted this past Spring. During the banquet on Saturday evening, several farmers from across the State, including Harvey, spoke of the assistance they had received from Farm Rescue and of their appreciation for what the organization had done. Harvey says that it is a good organization to have by your side, if and when the need arises.

Construction workers have been making progress on The Old Parsonage renovation project at 217 First Street this past week, despite the weather. Calvin Jacobson had his excavator at work and got the foundation and basement excavated, removing more than 600 cubic yards of dirt, clay and rocks. No buried evangelists, dinosaur bones or treasure chests have been discovered, at least none that Calvin is talking about. Strege Construction of Wyndmere had the footing Forms set on Friday, November 2 and the footings were poured on Monday, November 5. The next step is to install plumbing and in-floor heating prior to pouring the basement floor, and then the basement walls will be poured. It is estimated that the old house will be moved onto the new foundation within a week after the basement walls have been installed. After that, it will be a winter project for Buskohl Construction.

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The Rooster Crows – September 21, 2018

By Bill Anderson

Summer 2018 left in a huff between sundown on Sunday, September 16, and sunrise on Monday, September 17. At 5:00 p.m. on Sunday afternoon the temperature registered 93 degrees on a south wind gusting up to 45 mph. By 5:00 a.m. on Monday, September 17, the thermometer registered 48 degrees, accompanied by a 20 mph wind out of the north. A drop of 45 degrees in a span of 12 hours. What a difference a day makes! From wind burn to wind chill in 12 hours. The change in the weather also brought with it a few showers of rain, but not enough to get a reading in any of the local rain gauges. According to information obtained from the internet (and that’s always correct, right?) the Autumnal Equinox will occur on September 22 this year, and astronomers declare the Equinox to be the end of Summer and the beginning of Autumn. However, there is controversy in the scientific community even about the beginnings and the ends of the 4 seasons. Meteorologists use the Gregorian calendar, the one we all use today, to divide the year into 4 seasons, each 3 months in length, and, as far as the meteorologists are concerned, Autumn began back on September 1. So, are the astronomers correct, or are the meteorologists correct? The answer is: YES! At least the meteorologists are consistent. For them, Autumn always starts on September 1 each and every year, but, philosophers say that consistency is “the hobgoblin of small minds,” so being consistent may not be all that it’s cracked up to be. Astronomers, however, can’t quite pin down a date. They say that, depending on the year, the Earth’s orbit around the Sun, and several other factors, the Autumnal Equinox can occur, and Autumn begin, sometime between September 21 and September 24. So much for the precision of science! Both meteorologists and astronomers agree that after September 22 we will definitely be in the season of Autumn. That’s where the agreement ends, though, as the meteorologists claim that Autumn will end on November 30 and astronomers say that the Winter Solstice marking the end of Autumn and the beginning of Winter will occur on December 22. According to the President, the entire discussion is all part of a plot to take the spotlight away from him, and get people thinking about less significant personages, such as God. Could be.

Curt & Renee Larson arrived home on Wednesday, September 5, at the conclusion of a 3-week trip to Europe that had begun on August 14. Their first stop was Amsterdam, where they boarded one of Viking River Cruises riverboats for a journey up the Rhine River to Basil, Switzerland. In Switzerland they rented a car and drove to Frankfort, Germany, where they stayed with a friend who had been a foreign exchange student in the Larsons’ home a number of years ago, and who is now a Doctor practicing Psychiatry in Frankfort. “No comment,” said Curt. They next traveled to Norway to visit cousins of the Larson and Seavert families, and then on to Sweden where they discovered that Renee’s Swedish forebears had been Jonssons in Sweden and that they had taken the Sundquist name, derived from the name of their farm in Sweden, on their arrival in America. It was a great trip, but tiring, according to Curt, and, as with most trips, the best part was arriving back home.

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