Hens Do Crow – March 1, 2019

By Deborah Banish

Mother Nature has not been playing nice lately and I know I am getting tired of the snow. The snowfall and ground blizzard on February 24th resulted in some area events being postponed or cancelled. The Rutland Community Club Fun Night has been rescheduled for Sunday, March 10, same time (4-6 p.m.) at the Rutland Hall. The Rutland Sportsman’s Club cancelled the Fishing Derby at Silver Lake but the Club’s drawing will be held once all the sold tickets are received. The next snow event that is predicted for Friday, March 1, is the date of the Rutland Sportsman’s Club Fish Fry but that won’t stop this event from happening. The Sargent Central Clay Target League members will be holding their bake sale fundraiser that evening so be sure to head in early. Serving starts at 5:30 p.m.

The Rutland Community Development Corporation (RCDC) had to postpone their January 30th meeting to February 20th at the Rutland Senior Center. Several members attended but, due to weather, the turnout was less than planned. The Lariat Bar is current on the loan payments with the RCDC and those are the only two loans out at this time. The RCDC has money that is available to be invested in the community if any individual or entity is interested in establishing a business in town. Calvin Jacobson and Jake Erickson were both elected to another term on the RCDC Board and Cam Gulleson was elected to fill the remaining two-years of the term held by Sam Gillespie.

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The Rooster Crows – December 21, 2018

By Bill Anderson

Winter arrives on Friday, December 21, but the December Thaw has loosened Winter’s icy grasp for the past week and a half, pushing daytime highs into the mid-40’s while clearing streets of ice and snow. The mild temperatures have allowed harvest activities to move at a rapid pace, and some local producers, including the Pherson Farm which harvests its own crops as well as doing custom harvest work for others, finished up the corn harvest at the first of the week. Due to the drawn-out pace of the harvest this year the transportation system has been able to keep up, and, even though the 2018 corn and soybean crops have been among the largest in history, there has been no need to pile corn or beans in giant, golden mountains on the ground as in the past several harvests. With the 2018 crop records now in the history books, preparations for 2019 have already begun. There is some conjecture that buckwheat and spelts may make a comeback, but seed orders for those crops are light, so far.

The members of Rutland’s Bergman-Evenson Post #215 of The American Legion met at 3:00 p.m. on Wednesday, December 12, in the dining room of the Lariat Bar. The Adjutant’s report showed $3,868.00 available for the Post’s activities in the community. Members decided to make a $250.00 contribution to the Sargent Central students raising money to participate in the International Ambassadors of Music tour of Europe in the Summer of 2019. The members also discussed the Super Bowl Sunday breakfast/brunch on February 3, 2019, and decided to serve eggs, biscuits & gravy for the event. The Legion Auxiliary is also expected to have a sale of baked goods that same morning. Raffle tickets were distributed for a raffle in which an 8: power ice auger will be the prize. The price of the tickets is $1.00 apiece or 6 for $5.00. The drawing will be held on Sunday, February 3, in the Rutland Town Hall. The next meeting of Bergman-Evenson Post #215 will be during the month of January, at the call of the Commander. Officers of the Post are: Commander, Larry Christensen; Vice-Commander, Tom Manley; Adjutant, Doug Olstad; Chaplain, Ted Lee; and, Sergeant At Arms, Calvin Jacobson.

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The Rooster Crows – November 9, 2018

By Bill Anderson

Snow, wind & cold, those dreaded 4 letter words, hit with certainty on the evening of Election Day, Tuesday, November 6, and the following morning. An inch of snow, a 19-degree temperature and a 5-degree wind chill on Wednesday morning left no doubt that Old Man Winter is well armed for the season. The cold, wet weather has again delayed completion of harvest activities for many farmers, but some are getting close to the finish line. Colin Sundquist reported that 35 acres of soybeans remained to be harvested on the Sundquist farm north of Forman as of Sunday, November 4, and Mike Walstead reported that the soybean harvest had been completed and only 100 acres of corn remained to be threshed out on his Rutland Township farm as of Tuesday, November 6. Mike stated that the 2018 yields were the best he has seen since he started farming nearly 40 years ago. He didn’t want to boast, but if someone accused him of a soybean average of over 50 and a corn average of more than 200, he would have to plead “guilty!” He only wishes that he could plead guilty to $12 beans and $5 corn, and he would gladly accept his sentence with no remorse at all.

Harvey Bergstrom reports that he and Judy were at the Clarion Hotel in Minot on Saturday, November 3, to attend a meeting and banquet sponsored by the Farm Rescue organization. Harvey had suffered a heart attack a year ago, and Farm Rescue stepped in to help get his 900 acres of soybeans planted this past Spring. During the banquet on Saturday evening, several farmers from across the State, including Harvey, spoke of the assistance they had received from Farm Rescue and of their appreciation for what the organization had done. Harvey says that it is a good organization to have by your side, if and when the need arises.

Construction workers have been making progress on The Old Parsonage renovation project at 217 First Street this past week, despite the weather. Calvin Jacobson had his excavator at work and got the foundation and basement excavated, removing more than 600 cubic yards of dirt, clay and rocks. No buried evangelists, dinosaur bones or treasure chests have been discovered, at least none that Calvin is talking about. Strege Construction of Wyndmere had the footing Forms set on Friday, November 2 and the footings were poured on Monday, November 5. The next step is to install plumbing and in-floor heating prior to pouring the basement floor, and then the basement walls will be poured. It is estimated that the old house will be moved onto the new foundation within a week after the basement walls have been installed. After that, it will be a winter project for Buskohl Construction.

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The Rooster Crows – September 21, 2018

By Bill Anderson

Summer 2018 left in a huff between sundown on Sunday, September 16, and sunrise on Monday, September 17. At 5:00 p.m. on Sunday afternoon the temperature registered 93 degrees on a south wind gusting up to 45 mph. By 5:00 a.m. on Monday, September 17, the thermometer registered 48 degrees, accompanied by a 20 mph wind out of the north. A drop of 45 degrees in a span of 12 hours. What a difference a day makes! From wind burn to wind chill in 12 hours. The change in the weather also brought with it a few showers of rain, but not enough to get a reading in any of the local rain gauges. According to information obtained from the internet (and that’s always correct, right?) the Autumnal Equinox will occur on September 22 this year, and astronomers declare the Equinox to be the end of Summer and the beginning of Autumn. However, there is controversy in the scientific community even about the beginnings and the ends of the 4 seasons. Meteorologists use the Gregorian calendar, the one we all use today, to divide the year into 4 seasons, each 3 months in length, and, as far as the meteorologists are concerned, Autumn began back on September 1. So, are the astronomers correct, or are the meteorologists correct? The answer is: YES! At least the meteorologists are consistent. For them, Autumn always starts on September 1 each and every year, but, philosophers say that consistency is “the hobgoblin of small minds,” so being consistent may not be all that it’s cracked up to be. Astronomers, however, can’t quite pin down a date. They say that, depending on the year, the Earth’s orbit around the Sun, and several other factors, the Autumnal Equinox can occur, and Autumn begin, sometime between September 21 and September 24. So much for the precision of science! Both meteorologists and astronomers agree that after September 22 we will definitely be in the season of Autumn. That’s where the agreement ends, though, as the meteorologists claim that Autumn will end on November 30 and astronomers say that the Winter Solstice marking the end of Autumn and the beginning of Winter will occur on December 22. According to the President, the entire discussion is all part of a plot to take the spotlight away from him, and get people thinking about less significant personages, such as God. Could be.

Curt & Renee Larson arrived home on Wednesday, September 5, at the conclusion of a 3-week trip to Europe that had begun on August 14. Their first stop was Amsterdam, where they boarded one of Viking River Cruises riverboats for a journey up the Rhine River to Basil, Switzerland. In Switzerland they rented a car and drove to Frankfort, Germany, where they stayed with a friend who had been a foreign exchange student in the Larsons’ home a number of years ago, and who is now a Doctor practicing Psychiatry in Frankfort. “No comment,” said Curt. They next traveled to Norway to visit cousins of the Larson and Seavert families, and then on to Sweden where they discovered that Renee’s Swedish forebears had been Jonssons in Sweden and that they had taken the Sundquist name, derived from the name of their farm in Sweden, on their arrival in America. It was a great trip, but tiring, according to Curt, and, as with most trips, the best part was arriving back home.

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The Rooster Crows – July 27, 2018

By Bill Anderson

Sargent County is now as beautiful as it has ever been in living memory. Orvis Pearson, who was born here in 1925, and has farmed here for most of his life, states that he has never seen a crop look so good at this time of the year as does this one, and Orvis has a good memory, too. Early in the morning of Thursday, July 19, another rain event occurred. When the rain paused at 8:30 in the morning, Paul Anderson’s rain gauge registered .65 of an inch, and when it finally stopped that evening the total was 1.3, at least in Paul’s gauge and in Norbert Kulzer’s rain gauge. At Roger Pearson’s however, it amounted to 1.25 of an inch. Harvey Bergstrom reported that the day’s total added up to 3.2 inches at his farm 3 miles south of Cayuga, and the same amount at the old Kleingarn farm north of Cayuga. It was a good rain here, but a torrent of 7.5 inches hit Ellendale, 60 miles to the west, doing considerable damage to crops and roads. Another thunderstorm rolled through the Rutland area at about 2:30 in the morning on Wednesday, July 25, leaving .67 of an inch of rain and cooler, drier air in its wake. Many wheat fields in the Rutland area are now within a few days to a few weeks of being ready for harvest. Harvey Bergstrom is of the opinion that his wheat will be harvested between the 5th and the 10th of August. He and Judy had picked some heads from one field and counted from 30 to 50 kernels in each head. “Looks good,” says Harvey. The “Golden Harvest” begins.

Cameron & Jenny Gulleson; Pam Gulleson; Kevin & Samantha Gillespie; Paul Anderson; and, Bill Anderson; of this community were among the large crowd attending a 2018 campaign event on the evening of Thursday, July 19, at Joel Heitkamp’s home on Lake Elsie, near Hankinson. Mac Schneider, candidate for the U.S. House of Representatives, and Jim Dotzenrod, candidate for North Dakota Commissioner of Agriculture, were present and addressed the gathering. Mac Schneider is a lawyer in private practice and a former State Senator from Grand Forks, and Jim Dotzenrod, a farmer from Wyndmere, served as a State Senator from this area from 1974 to 1994 and from 2008 to the present. Sen. Dotzenrod addressed 3 main issues: trade, which should be free, fair and open; tariffs, which should be low or non-existent; and, ethanol, which should be promoted to help put a floor under the price of corn and to clean up the environment. To those 3 issues, candidate Schneider added: Healthcare, which should be affordable and available to all; strengthening & preserving Social Security & Medicare, now under attack from the White House and the Congress; strengthening crop insurance, production guarantees and price protection in the Farm Bill; and, controlling the budget deficit, which has exploded under the current GOP controlled Congress and White House. Also attending the event were 25th District Democratic-NPL endorsed candidates for the North Dakota Legislature: Perry Miller, candidate for the State Senate; Bill Berlin, candidate for the State House of Representatives; and, incumbent State Representative Elise Mitskog. Former State legislators in attendance included: former Senator Joel Heitkamp of Hankinson; former Representative Pam Gulleson of Rutland; and, former Representative Don Lloyd of Lisbon. Also attending the event were Rutland natives Sonja (Anderson) Christensen and Corrine (Narum) Romereim, now of Wahpeton. Vote By Mail and early voting will commence on Thursday, September 27, in Sargent County and many other North Dakota counties, according to information obtained from Sargent County Auditor Pam Maloney.

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The Rooster Crows – June 1, 2018

By Bill Anderson

All of that worrying about the lack of rain finally paid off early on the morning of Sunday, May 27, when Mother Nature kicked up her heels with a rip-roaring thunder and lightning show that was accompanied by an inch of rain in Rutland and its immediate vicinity. As is usual with thunder-storms, though, the coverage was not uniform. Randy Pearson reported .7 of an inch at his farm in Shuman Township, and Rick Bosse reported “nary a drop” at his farm home near Brampton. Brad Wyum also reported an inch of rain on the Wyum farm north of Rutland, but no rain at all on the land he and brother Tom farm near Guelph, in Dickey County. The Brampton and Guelph areas had received a .6-inch rainfall a week ago, though, when Rutland only got between .1 and .15 of an inch, so, what goes around comes around. Well, this won’t be the last rain that comes just in the nick of time, but it was the first one of this season, and it was sure welcomed by all, even though there were a few hailstones thrown in just to keep folks from getting over confident.

Janet Bradbury reports from the Warren Ranch near Rapid City SD that rain has even been falling in that normally arid region of our sister State. Janet reported via e-mail on Tuesday, May 29: “…I’m optimistic because it is raining here now, really nice slow soaker so far. Had 1.36 inches in last two days…” Thanks to Janet for the report, and congratulations to the ranchers in southwestern South Dakota, whose cattle will be dining on lush green grass for a while.

CORRECTION: Last week it was reported here that Jacob Mehrer, son of Shannon & Hilary Mehrer, was the only student from Rutland who would be graduating as a member of SCHS Class of ’18 on Sunday, May 27. That report was in error. There is another 2018 SCHS graduate of whom this community is equally proud. Also graduating from Sargent Central High School on Sunday, May 27, 2018, was Johnny Munch, son of Joe & Tammy Munch of this community. The Munch family resides at 315 Gay Street, and they have been Rutland citizens for about a year. The Rutland community extends congratulations to Johnny Munch, and to his parents, on his commencement from Sargent Central High School, and wishes him good fortune in his new endeavors. Our apologies to new graduate Johnny Munch, and to his family, for the oversight.

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