The Rooster Crows – January 11, 2019

by Bill Anderson

We are now in the post-holiday season, when all of the fun and frivolity of the past 6 weeks is weighing heavily on our waistlines, if not on our consciences. Well, there’s a cure for that! The Board of Directors of the Rutland Fitness Center recently sent out notices that it’s time to pay annual dues, and to start working off all of those Thanksgiving and Christmas calories. Membership renewals are now due for the Rutland Fitness Center, the Directors have reminded us. Membership fees are $150.00 per year for an individual and $235.00 per year for a family membership. Membership fees may be sent to: RFC, PO Box 24, Rutland ND 58067. Members are asked to include their cell phone # so the new entry code can be sent to them. The code will change on January 12. Due to insurance requirements, minor children utilizing the Fitness Center must be supervised by a responsible adult at all times. The Rutland Fitness Center is located in the American Legion Hall at 123 Gay Street in Rutland. It is open 24 hours a day and 7 days a week to members. At that price, the cost is about 3 cents an hour for a Family membership. A small price to pay for individual, family and community fitness and good health. Directors of the Rutland Fitness Center are: Ione Pherson; Lori McLaen; and Jennifer Christianson.

Sonja Christensen reports that, as of Monday, January 7, 41 teams of pinochle players had preregistered for the 24th Annual Rudy Anderson Pinochle Tournament that will be held on Saturday, February 2, 2019, in the Rutland Town Hall. One team that will be new to the tournament is a father-daughter combination from Grand Forks who read about the tournament on Rutland’s internet web site and then contacted Sonja to sign up. Sonja anticipates that another 21 to 25 teams will have registered before play begins on Ground Hog’s Day. The tournament, which is co-chaired by Sonja Christensen and Bryce Carlson, is sponsored by the Rutland Community Club. Continue reading “The Rooster Crows – January 11, 2019”

The Rooster Crows – December 7, 2018

By Bill Anderson

The cold weather of the past several weeks has thickened the ice on local lakes to 7 inches or more, enough to support the weight of ice fishermen and ice fishing houses. Norbert Kulzer reported that there were three ice fishing houses on Buffalo Lake on Tuesday, December 4, and one on Consolidated Lake, along with a couple of fishermen out on the ice in cold weather fishing gear. Several houses were on the ice at Silver Lake last week, but they had picked up and moved to some other location by Tuesday afternoon. No reports of fishing success have been received, and when fishermen aren’t talking it usually means that they are catching fish and don’t want anyone else to find out about it. Of course, it could mean that there just aren’t many fish being caught, but that’s not as interesting.

Rutland native Dan Narum, Presiding Judge of North Dakota’s Southeast Judicial District for the past several years, was preparing to deliver jury instructions at the conclusion of a trial in the Dickey County Courthouse in Ellendale last Tuesday, November 27, when he stood up from his desk and discovered that his right leg was numb. A terrible pain in his back put him to the floor. Ever the professional, the Judge got himself back to his desk, called the 2 attorneys in the case into his office, explained the situation to them, then delivered the jury instructions to the waiting jurors in written form, and had himself taken to the hospital. He was first taken to Aberdeen, the closest hospital, where a serious back problem was diagnosed. Immediate surgery was necessary, but a surgeon capable of performing it was not available, so Dan made a trip to Sanford Hospital in Fargo where the surgery was performed on Tuesday night. Tests indicated that the surgery had been successful, and, “…when I moved my toes about ¼ of an inch, they really got excited,” Dan reported. On Friday, November 30, he moved to Sanford’s Physical Therapy Unit on South University Drive for what was expected to be 2 weeks of intensive physical therapy, but his recovery and progress was so rapid that he was scheduled to be released from the hospital to return to his home in Lamoure on Wednesday, December 5. Dan states that he has an elk hunt booked in northeastern New Mexico beginning on January 1, and is still planning, and hoping, to be able to make it happen. Well, Dan is a tough and determined guy. If he can’t make it to New Mexico, maybe he can issue a judicial order, and have the elk brought to him. In the meantime, he is recuperating at home, in the care of his wife, Caroline, and their 2 children. Dan’s many friends in Rutland wish him a speedy and complete recovery, and a good hunt, too.

Continue reading “The Rooster Crows – December 7, 2018”

The Rooster Crows – September 7, 2018

By Bill Anderson

Thunder, Lightning and rain visited Rutland at about 2:30 on the morning of Sunday, September 2. Roger Pearson reported that his rain gauge showed .4 of an inch after the rain had stopped and the sun had risen.  Roger’s neighbor, Norbert Kulzer, states that he is pretty sure that his rain gauge indicated .5 of an inch. Jason Arth reported .5 of an inch at Northern Plains Ag in Cayuga, and John Buskohl stated that .75 of an inch was received in Milnor.  John had just finished cutting 6 acres of alfalfa hay on Saturday, a sure rain-maker, and he takes full responsibility, or credit, for the event.

Paul Anderson of this community and Carol Fridgen of Spider Lake MN were joined by several friends: Jim and Denise Hawes, Lake Belle Taine MN; Mike and Tudee, Dandalet, Spider Lake MN; and, Terry and Angela Carlson, 8th Crow Wing Lake MN; in Rutland on Thursday, August 30. The eight friends enjoyed lunch at The Lariat Bar in Rutland, toured the community, and topped off the day with the “Farm To Table” Dinner at The Coteau des Prairies Lodge that evening.  All enjoyed the fine dining, good company and excellent lodgings furnished by The Lodge. They returned to Minnesota on Friday, August 31.

Continue reading “The Rooster Crows – September 7, 2018”

The Rooster Crows – August 24, 2018

By Bill Anderson

The Great Smokey Mountains of Virginia and the Carolinas had nothing on The Great Smokey Prairies of North Dakota last week. Smoke drifting in from forest fires in northern Canada covered the prairies in a gray haze that burned the eyes and caused problems for anyone with a respiratory condition. The smoke was thick enough that the Coteau des Prairies hills south of town were not visible from Rutland for most of the day. The Canadian smoke had cleared some by Saturday, and Sunday’s thunderstorms washed some of the smoke out of the air, at least for a while. In a reversal of normal results, Roger Pearson’s rain gauge showed 1.2 inches of precipitation as of 8:30 on Sunday morning, while the gauge of his next-door neighbor, Norbert Kulzer, registered only 1.1 inch. Randy Pearson reported that the gauge in his Shuman Township farmyard showed 1.85 inch at about the same time, and Ted Lee stated that Mother Nature came up short in his neighborhood, leaving only .45 of an inch of rain at his Tewaukon Township farm home. Harvey Bergstrom and Kurt Breker reported .7 of an inch south of Cayuga, while Doug Spieker reported that his rain gauge captured .9 of an inch, and Jim Lunneborg said that 1.5 inch was recorded at his farm south of Buffalo Lake. By Monday morning the consensus of The Assembled Wise Men was that the soybean crop in the Rutland area now has enough moisture to take it to harvest, and that may be true for corn, too.

Harvey Bergstrom walked out into one of his corn fields while on his way to town on the morning of Saturday, August 18, randomly selected an ear of corn and pulled it off the stalk. He then brought that cob of corn with him to The Lariat for examination and inspection by The Assembled Wise Men. Once husked, it was revealed that the large cob was filled with kernels from end to end, and that the kernels were beginning to dent. Harvey is a virtuoso on the accordion and concertina, and his corn grows up listening to a 4:4 polka beat. Happy corn is productive corn, and there’s nothing happier than a good, old-fashioned polka, the kind Harvey plays at Uff-Da Day each year. After all, corn has ears, big ears this year, so it might as well listen to something good. Anyone who wants to know what makes Harvey go, and his corn grow, should be at Uff-Da Day in Rutland on Sunday, October 7, to hear Harvey’s happy music.

Continue reading “The Rooster Crows – August 24, 2018”

The Rooster Crows – May 4, 2018

By Bill Anderson

The roar of diesel engines mingled with the calls of geese, ducks and pheasants as 2018’s Spring field work commenced in this area. Shane Breker, Mike Anderson, Kurt Breker and the Banish Brothers, Mike & Rick, were all planting wheat by Thursday, April 26, while Lyle Erickson, Harvey Bergstrom and Joe Breker, among others, were planning to have planters at work on some of their fields by Monday, April 30, and Tuesday, May 1. There have been a few reports of corn being planted, but most operators in this area are of the consensus that the ground is still too cold for corn or soybean seed to be sown. The frost is just beginning to come out in some fields, and the side hills that were covered by snowbanks only 2 weeks ago are still soggy traps waiting to ensnare an unsuspecting farmer and his tractor. Despite Spring’s perils, however, there is new energy in the air with the onset of Spring planting. The seed is in the ground, and all things are possible. It’s great to be alive! A good rain would be helpful.

The Rutland City Board of Equalization reconvened at 5:00 p.m. on Tuesday, April 24, in the Rutland Town Hall, with Council President Mike Mahrer; City Auditor Deb Banish; and, Aldermen Rodney Erickson; Delores Lysne; and, Bert Siemieniewski; present. Mayor Ron Narum was absent. Also present for the reconvened meeting was City Assessor/County Director of Tax Equalization Denise Ferderer. Ms. Ferderer discussed how the State Board of Equalization had arrived at the current recommended valuations for residential property in Rutland last October and showed comparisons with residential properties in other jurisdictions within Sargent County. The Council approved valuations in the City, with a 20% across the board reduction from the level directed by the State Board of Equalization last Fall. The City’s valuations will next be reviewed at the County Board of Equalization meeting in June, and, finally, at the State Board of Equalization meeting in Bismarck this coming August. Due to requirements imposed by the State Legislature, all units of local government will have to have their 2019 budget work completed a month earlier this year. The 2017 session of the North Dakota State Legislature also ended the 12% property tax buy down and structured funding for elementary and secondary education in such a way that many, if not most, school districts in the State were required to increase their property tax levies in order to fund operations. As school funding accounts for approximately 60% of the local property tax bill, most owners of real property would have experienced significant increases in property tax, even without an increase in valuation. While forcing property tax increases on local taxpayers, the State Legislature has reduced State revenues by giving massive tax cuts to out-of-State corporations, such as oil companies, that have significantly impacted local and State infrastructure throughout North Dakota. Well, it all starts with the local city and township Board of Equalization, where your friends and neighbors try to work with a tax policy and funding formula drafted in the Board room of an Oklahoma oil company.

Continue reading “The Rooster Crows – May 4, 2018”

Booya

When I was younger, I remember going with my grandparents to many fall Catholic Church booya festivals where hundreds would attend.  Booya was made in several large pots – generally about 50 gallons each  – and there would be beef, chicken and pork cooked in the broth.  Vegetables were added, usually carrots, potatoes, and celery along with a variety of seasonings.  Generally booya takes several days to prepare to get it ‘just right’ before the soup (or stew) was served in bowls.  Those were always fun festivals and Church fundraisers.  Of course, they always included games for the kids and adults too which made it all the merrier.

Seafood BoilThe Coteau des Prairies Lodge is hosting a Seafood Boil on Sunday which sounds a lot like an old fashioned booya but they have an added twist (and no bowls!).  The Seafood boil starts with cooking the vegetables and then adding sausage and seafood (and maybe other meat) to the kettle.  When the meal is ready, they simply dump it down the middle of the table and voila’ it becomes finger food!  Sounds like a great time and fun for everyone.

More information can be found at The Lodge website.  Hurry because there is only a limited amount of space available for the Seafood Boil.