The Rooster Crows – Nov. 19, 2021

By Bill Anderson

Mother Nature gave Rutland a shot of rain on Wednesday, November 10, that coated streets and sidewalks with a sheet of ice, and then followed up with some big, fluffy snowflakes to create a slushy, mushy, slippery mess. The rainfall measured .25 of an inch of rain according to the electronic gauges at the Chuck & Mary Beth Anderson farm 6½ miles southwest of Rutland and the Mike & Debbie Banish farm 2 miles south of town. According to The Assembled Wise Men, there was about 2 inches of snow from the flurries on Thursday, Friday & Saturday. Fierce winds, gusting up to 60 mph, on the night of Thursday, November 11, raised concerns, but everything seemed to be intact when the big blow subsided on Friday. A sunny day on Monday, the 15th, and a temperature in the mid-40’s on Tuesday, the 16th, cleared out most of last week’s ice & snow, making room for the next blast that’s sure to come. A new blast of wind was tearing at the countryside on the morning of Wednesday, November 17, and chuck Anderson said that the anemometer on his electronic weather station indicated gusts up to 37 mph by 9:00 a.m. The wind was out of the west, so, if it doesn’t relocate us to Minnesota, we’ll report further next week.

Rutland native Janelle Brakke reports that she has moved from the South Fargo apartment which has been her home for the past 9 years to a townhouse on 39th Avenue South in Fargo, a few blocks west of 45th Street. According to Janelle, the townhouse complex in which her new home is situated was originally constructed in the 1970’s, but it has been well maintained and was recently thoroughly renovated. The townhouse is considerably larger than her old apartment and, best of all, it has an attached garage. Janelle is an RN, and is employed by Clay County Public Health in Moorhead.

Rodney Erickson reports that harvest activity in the Rutland area wrapped up last week, and that the final loads of corn from the 2021 crop were hauled in to the Rutland Elevator on the evening of Tuesday, November 9, just before the rain started. The best that can be said for the 2021 corn and soybean crops in this area is that neither was as bad as anticipated, and that both were better than expected. As the late Dave Hoflen of this community often observed, “There have been 2 good years in North Dakota, 1914 and next year.” Hope springs eternal, and there’s better times a’comin’!

Continue reading “The Rooster Crows – Nov. 19, 2021”

The Rooster Crows – Oct. 29, 2021

By Bill Anderson

The rain keeps on coming, a little here, a little there, and the next thing you know, we’re talking real water. Roger Pearson’s rain gauge registered .8 of an inch after the rain stopped on Wednesday, October 20, and held another .55” after the rain on the afternoon of Sunday, October 24, while Norbert Kulzer’s gauge registered nothing from either event, as he had taken his gauge in so it doesn’t freeze up when the hard freeze does finally arrive. Mike Banish reported that the gauge out at the Banish farm, 2 miles south of town, held .88” on the 20th, and .55” on the 24th; and Chuck Anderson said that the gauge at his farm in Weber Township measured .79” from the 20th and .42” on the 24th. As of this writing, on the morning of Wednesday, October 27, it is raining again, and Chuck Anderson reported that .4” had fallen at his place by 9:00 a.m. Tune in next week for the complete report.

Sargent County Public Health District’s nurses are scheduled to be at the Rutland Senior Citizens’ Center from 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. on Monday, November 1, to administer covid-19 booster shots. These boosters are the Moderna brand. There is no charge, so stop by and get boosted. Sargent County Public Health District Administrator Brenda Peterson reports that Health District nurses have also been delivering the Pfizer booster. According to Ms. Peterson, those seeking a booster for the Johnson & Johnson vaccine are being referred to the Forman Drug for assistance. Ms. Peterson also reported that there are still some folks who are coming in for their first vaccination shots. For information about covid-19 vaccinations and boosters, call: Sargent County Public Health at 724-3725; Forman Drug at 724-6222; or Sanford Clinic at 742-3267. In Sargent County, the vaccinations are not only administered with efficiency, but those getting a shot will also receive a big smile, free of charge. A new staff member, Tracie Ruch, has recently joined the Sargent County Public Health District team. Her position is funded by a grant, according to Ms. Peterson. The grant is good to 2023 and will have to be reapplied for at that time.

The Rutland Community Club met at 5:00 p.m. on Wednesday, October 20, in the Rutland Town Hall. President Katie McLaen reports that the first topic of discussion was a review of Uff-Da Day XXXVI that was held on Sunday, October 3. All agreed that the event was a big success, and planning for next year’s Uff-Da Day, scheduled for Sunday, October 2, 2022, has begun. There will be some tweaking of the formula, with some new Uff-Da Day events and activities in the development stage. The preliminary financial report indicates that the 2021 version of Uff-Da Day resulted in net income of approximately $13,000 for the Community Club. In other business, club members present approved the purchase of new Christmas decorations and banners for Rutland’s Main Street. Santa Claus has accepted Rutland’s invitation to make his 76th annual pre-Christmas visit to Rutland since the end of World War II travel restrictions. Santa Claus Day in Rutland will be on Saturday, December 11, this year, with Santa scheduled to make his appearance at the Rutland Town Hall from 5:00 to 7:00 p.m. Mark it on your calendar: Santa Claus Day in Rutland on Saturday, December 11.

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The Rooster Crows – April 23, 2021

By Bill Anderson

April seems to be bucking the season. It opened with a beautiful weekend over Easter, with lots of sunshine and temperatures in the 70’s, but the farther it goes, the colder it gets. The low temperature in Rutland on Wednesday, April 21, was 25 degrees and snow flurries, while Fargo set a record for cold on this date with 18. That’s 82 degrees colder than the record high for the same date of 100 above, set back in 1980. Thursday, April 22, was the 42nd annual Earth Day, a day dedicated to contemplating what we have been doing to our planet, and how to correct our blunders. Not to worry, though. President Joe Biden has hosted a “Climate Summit” of world leaders to discuss the situation. In keeping with the spirit of the occasion, and in observance of worldwide covid-19 recommendations, the summit was a virtual one, held online via ZOOM or some other video conferencing program. Picture it, hundreds of elected presidents and prime ministers, hereditary monarchs and tyrannical dictators in bathrobes, sweat suits and bedroom slippers, wearing facemasks and sitting in front of their computers, sipping coffee and discussing the fate of the world. Should we be comforted? Ask the Assembled Wise Men 42 years from now and they’ll let you know.

Hal Nelson has been treating an injured leg for the past week, the injury sustained while fishing at Sprague Lake. The walleyes had been biting, so Hal was out there enjoying the sport when he noticed some action on his line. He jumped to get the line and set the hook, slipped on a rock and fell onto some willow stumps left by a foraging beaver. The willow stumps were sharpened like punji stakes and put some serious scratches on Hal’s leg. He is getting around, though, and hopes to be back up to full speed in the near future.

Kenneth Maly of Chinook MT was visiting old friends in Rutland on the evening of Wednesday, April 14. Kenny is one of the sons of the late Francis & Rozilla Maly, and he grew up on the Maly family farm in Weber Township, south of Rutland. He is now employed by the Blaine County highway department out of Chinook, and he states that the county there has more than 1,300 miles of county gravel roads to maintain. Gravel is difficult to obtain for parts of Blaine County, Kenny says, and some roads are posted warning drivers to stay off of them when it is wet. “They might be out there until it dries up again,” he says. Kenny was employed by the Sargent County Road Department back in the 1990’s, before he moved to Montana. He planned to drive to Minneapolis to visit his daughter and 5-year-old granddaughter on Friday, April 16, and to return to Rutland on April 22 for a few more days of visiting friends and family here before returning to Montana. Kenny says that he likes living in the Chinook community, but he still has plenty of good friends and good memories in Rutland, too.

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The Rooster Crows -April 16, 2021

By Bill Anderson

The 2021 Weather Roller Coaster ride isn’t over yet! Since Easter weekend the temperature has gone from the 70’s down to the 30’s, back up to the 60’s and back down to the 20’s, with a return to the 50’s predicted for the coming weekend. It’s either famine or feast in the rain department, too. After the dust was blowing like “The Dirty 30’s” during the week prior to Easter, approximately 2 inches of very welcome rain was delivered to Rutland and vicinity on Tuesday, Wednesday & Thursday, April 6, 7 & 8. The heaviest rain was reported from south of town, with 2.97 inches at the Jacob Breker farm on top of the hills; 2¼” reported by Mike Banish at his farm 2 miles south of town; a second-hand report of 2” at Mike Wyum’s farm a mile east and a mile north of town; 1.75” in Jesse Brakke’s gauge 2 miles north and 3½ east of Rutland; and, Rick Banish reporting 1¼” of rain at his farmstead in Kingston Township, north of Cayuga. No reliable readings were available in Rutland, as Norbert Kulzer discovered a hole in the side of his gauge, just above the ½ inch mark, and Roger Pearson didn’t get his gauge out in the yard until Wednesday afternoon, about halfway through the rainfall event. Roger’s gauge did measure an inch, though, even if it did get a late start. Snow on Tuesday & Wednesday, April 13 & 14, marks the low point of the roller coaster for this week. If you don’t like that, just wait a minute. It’ll change.

Chuck & Mary Beth Anderson returned to their Weber Township farm home on Thursday, April 8, at the conclusion of a 2-week sight-seeing excursion to Sedona AZ and the Grand Canyon of the Colorado River. Chuck reports that, after being snowed in for 2 days in New Mexico, they got going and decided to take a look at “Old Town” Santa Fe NM but could barely get through the streets with their ¾ Ton Pickup and Travel Trailer, and couldn’t find a place to park, anyway, so they kept on driving. The Grand Canyon is an awe-inspiring sight, they report. They drove through the 1.6-mile-long Eisenhower Tunnel through the Colorado Rocky Mountains on the return trip, and that was breath-taking, too, Chuck reports, as the roadway at both ends of the tunnel was slick with snow, slush, and ice. It was tough driving through the mountains, where Spring is still a month or two in the future. It was a great trip, Chuck reports, but, as with most trips, the best part was pulling into the yard at home. 

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Hens Do Crow! Dec. 4, 2020

The Sargent County 4-H Awards Program was held virtually over Zoom on November 22. The program is usually held in Forman with an audience of members, parents, and grandparents but things were changed this year. The Sargent County Extension Office staff did a wonderful job coordinating the event. The program began with the 4-H Club Leader Awards, the Friend of 4-H Award, and First Year Member Awards. Several 4-H Contest Awards were presented for Crops and Horse Judging, the Horse Quiz Bowl, and the Sargent County Communication Award. The Project Awards, Interview Awards and Membership Awards were presented to deserving youth who had entered the 4-H Achievement Days that were also held virtually in July. Congratulations to the Rutland Raiders 4-H Members who took home over twenty awards in the various categories.

On Saturday, December 5th, The Lariat Bar was going to celebrate owner Pete’s birthday by hosting an ugly sweater party and karaoke. However, with the limited capacity and early closing hours they have decided to change things up. They will still celebrate Pete’s birthday and have an Ugly Sweater Party and Karaoke just a bit earlier. Stop on by for a few drinks, sing a song or two and have a great meal all starting at 3 pm. And do not forget to wear your ugliest sweater and wish Pete a happy birthday! Hope to see you all there!

The Rutland City Council will hold its last meeting of 2020 on Monday, December 7, starting at 5 p.m. Council meetings are always open to the public. Social distancing is maintained.

Santa Claus is making alternative travel and visitation plans during this year of COVID-19. With the change in his plans, the Rutland Community Club will not be hosting a visit to the Rutland Hall this December. Like the Elf on the Shelf this year that has to be quarantined for 14 days before making his rounds, Santa can not squeeze in all the time for the visits with quarantine rules. Santa is making a plan for his safe visits to homes this winter, so you better be good!

That is all the news from Rutland this week. Stay warm and be safe.

The Rooster Crows — October 30, 2020

By Bill Anderson

Last week’s weather report in this column was way too optimistic. Old Man Winter not only sent his calling card, he sent a load of furniture and started moving in for the season. Anywhere from 6 to 8 inches of new snow on Wednesday, October 21, was added to the two to four inches that had blanketed the area on Monday, October 19, giving Rutland and vicinity the appearance of full-blown Winter. Additionally, the temperature has not ventured above the freezing mark since last Wednesday, either, adding the feel of Winter to the appearance. The forecast is calling for the mercury to climb back up into the 40’s for Halloween on Saturday, October 31, and the return of Central Standard Time at 2:00 a.m. on the morning of Sunday, November 1. The end of Daylight Saving Time brings up another matter that needs discussing: if Daylight Saving Time is in effect for nearly eight months, and Standard Time is in effect for only about four months, why isn’t Daylight Saving Time called Standard Time, and the period of Standard Time called something else, Daylight Spending Time, perhaps? Back during the first OPEC Oil Embargo in 1973, then President Nixon imposed year-round Daylight Saving Time on the nation, an unpopular move that neither saved nor spent even one lumen of daylight. As we recall, Nixon liked to work in the dark, though, and that may have been a factor that contributed to the early end of his Presidency in August of 1974, about 2½ years before the end of his second term in the White House. Well, he said that he wasn’t a crook, and he did manage to prove that he wasn’t a very good one. So, let’s see now, where were we?  Oh yes, Winter! Well, it’s here, and it’s not welcome, and that’s all we’re going to say about that!

Peter and Michelle Denault, and their staff at the Lariat Bar, have made a very good impression on the community since they first reopened the establishment on Friday, October 16. In addition to a fine selection of beverages, the Denaults have also been providing some outstanding dining from the grill. For information about hours and menu items call the Lariat Bar at 724-6239. Everybody is welcome at The Lariat!

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