The Rooster Crows – November 9, 2018

By Bill Anderson

Snow, wind & cold, those dreaded 4 letter words, hit with certainty on the evening of Election Day, Tuesday, November 6, and the following morning. An inch of snow, a 19-degree temperature and a 5-degree wind chill on Wednesday morning left no doubt that Old Man Winter is well armed for the season. The cold, wet weather has again delayed completion of harvest activities for many farmers, but some are getting close to the finish line. Colin Sundquist reported that 35 acres of soybeans remained to be harvested on the Sundquist farm north of Forman as of Sunday, November 4, and Mike Walstead reported that the soybean harvest had been completed and only 100 acres of corn remained to be threshed out on his Rutland Township farm as of Tuesday, November 6. Mike stated that the 2018 yields were the best he has seen since he started farming nearly 40 years ago. He didn’t want to boast, but if someone accused him of a soybean average of over 50 and a corn average of more than 200, he would have to plead “guilty!” He only wishes that he could plead guilty to $12 beans and $5 corn, and he would gladly accept his sentence with no remorse at all.

Harvey Bergstrom reports that he and Judy were at the Clarion Hotel in Minot on Saturday, November 3, to attend a meeting and banquet sponsored by the Farm Rescue organization. Harvey had suffered a heart attack a year ago, and Farm Rescue stepped in to help get his 900 acres of soybeans planted this past Spring. During the banquet on Saturday evening, several farmers from across the State, including Harvey, spoke of the assistance they had received from Farm Rescue and of their appreciation for what the organization had done. Harvey says that it is a good organization to have by your side, if and when the need arises.

Construction workers have been making progress on The Old Parsonage renovation project at 217 First Street this past week, despite the weather. Calvin Jacobson had his excavator at work and got the foundation and basement excavated, removing more than 600 cubic yards of dirt, clay and rocks. No buried evangelists, dinosaur bones or treasure chests have been discovered, at least none that Calvin is talking about. Strege Construction of Wyndmere had the footing Forms set on Friday, November 2 and the footings were poured on Monday, November 5. The next step is to install plumbing and in-floor heating prior to pouring the basement floor, and then the basement walls will be poured. It is estimated that the old house will be moved onto the new foundation within a week after the basement walls have been installed. After that, it will be a winter project for Buskohl Construction.

Continue reading “The Rooster Crows – November 9, 2018”

Garden Party

It is time to think Spring!  The sun has been trying to shine on Rutland between all the rain showers that have hit the area.  The three inches of rain has soaked into the ground and the daylilies and hostas are among the many flowers showing their greenery.

May is usually when The Friendly Garden Club hosts its annual spring auction in Rutland. Unfortunately, the Club has disbanded and there will be no spring auction this year or years to come (at least at the time of this writing). However, there is hope for garden enthusiasts! This year the Little Old Ladies of Sargent County are hosting a Garden Party in nearby Milnor on Monday, May 19, from 6 to 9 p.m., at the Lakeview Golf Course.

Admission to the Garden Party is a “garden item” — a plant, gardening tool(s), garden decor, yard art, potting soil or seeds.  Garden items will be accepted between 6:00 and 7:00 p.m. Those items will be placed on a silent auction which will end at 8:30 p.m.  There will also be a cash drawing and door prizes.  Hors d’oeuvres and sweets will be served and wine and other beverages will also be available for sale.

If you have attended any of the other events sponsored by the Little Old Ladies of Sargent County, you know everyone will have a great time!  All proceeds go to the Sargent County Relay for Life.  Come on out and have some fun and contribute to a great cause!!

Tractor Drive

Tractor Drive 2013  The Sargent County Relay for Life (RFL) planning is well underway with the main event in June (in Gwinner).   In 2012, two teams hosted a Tractor Drive with 55 entries.  Jim’s Journey is hosting the event this year on Saturday, June 8, and they hope to have even more participants.  The drive starts – and ends – in Rutland so be sure to get your registration mailed in for an eventful day. All proceeds go directly to RFL.  If you don’t have a tractor to enter, come to town and spend the day with us.

Rutland Rockets Sale

The Rutland Rockets will be hosting a free-will Rummage Sale & Bake Sale on Saturday, May 7th, 9:00-Noon, at Nordland Lutheran Parish Hall, Rutland. They are also sponsoring a “Winners Board” at the Lariat Bar, Rutland. (There will be 5 $100 winners…100 squares at $10/square.) They will also be selling raffle tickets…details to follow. Contact Bonnie Anderson (724-3617) or Wendy Jacobson (724-3975).

Donations of baked goods and gently-used items would be appreciated. Donated items can be dropped off at the Nordland Lutheran Parish Hall, Thursday, May 5, 9:00am – Friday, May 6, 6:00pm. Baked goods may be dropped off until Saturday, May 7th, 9:00am

If you want to join our Relay for Life team, please sign up at the Sargent County Relay for Life website.

Under Water!

Today it was time for sandbagging at the Sargent Central School. Water has flooded the football field and is getting closer to the school’s air ventilation system. Thanks to several Good Samaritans another row of sandbags was added to the pile which should help for a while — but we’re expecting rain. There are lots of areas that are already under water and the Sargent County Emergency Management has issued a road report that includes today’s road conditions. Who knows what tomorrow will bring. Drive safely out there and stay home if possible. If you venture out, watch carefully ’cause not even the County Highways are safe. Check out today’s closings here.

The Rooster Crows – March 19, 2010

By Bill Anderson

The V formations of Canada geese beating their way north through gloomy skies and drizzly rain, coupled with the rush of water from melting snowdrifts, muddy roads and slush filled yards, portend impending Spring in Rutland and vicinity. The hardy Canada geese, among the first of the migratory waterfowl to move north each year, are already setting up housekeeping in their usual locations, while local soybean and corn growers are marking the sites in preparation for the annual anti-depredation campaign that will soon commence. The vanguard of the snow and blue goose migration is now in Nebraska and heading this way, a point of interest to those who wish to participate in the Spring Conservation Hunting Season now open on those wily birds. Sunshine and temperatures in the 40’s on Tuesday and Wednesday brought a lift to the spirits and put some spring into feet that have been slogging through the winter bearing the weight of 5-buckle overshoes for the past several months. Mother Nature even removed some snowbanks to expose some green grass in honor of St. Patrick’s day. The forecast is calling for a relapse into winter conditions for the weekend, but Winter’s icy grip has now been broken. This is not the end, but it most assuredly is the beginning of the end.

If you have been thinking that 2010 has had some dark and gloomy days so far, you have been right. The National Weather Service for North Dakota reported last week that there was fog and overcast conditions on 54 of the first 68 days in 2010. If the old-timers’ were right about getting rain 90 days after a fog, we are in for an abundance of precipitation during the months of April, May and June. Don’t put your overshoes away just yet.

Rural mail carrier Jim Lunneborg escaped serious injury from an exploding battery on his farm on Thursday evening, March 4. Jim had the battery charger hooked up to the battery on an old tractor that had not been started for a while and, when he hit the switch to crank the engine over, the lead-acid battery blew up. He had intended to move the tractor from the shed where it had been in winter storage to make more room for calving cows. The hard plastic of the exploded battery case shattered one lens in his eyeglasses and left him with several cuts on his face and forehead. Fortunately, there were no acid burns. The incident did keep Jim off the mail route for a couple of days, though, until repairs to his eyeglasses were completed. It is expected that there will be no permanent scars on Jim’s handsome visage. No report has been received on the condition of the tractor. Jim is a collector of vintage Allis-Chalmers tractors and equipment, and some of the local aficionados are concerned about possible damage to the tractor, too.

Continue reading “The Rooster Crows – March 19, 2010”