Hens Do Crow! Nov. 8, 2019

Deborah Banish

The first Zumba session was held in the Rutland Community Center on Sunday, November 3rd. About twenty area residents – both young and old – came out for the exercise session and to have some fun. Zumba is a total-body exercise that is good for core strengthening and flexibility, so every participant gets a good workout. If you missed the first session be sure to join the group on the first Sunday of the month. Where else can you have a fun workout for only $1.00 per person?

The Rutland City Council held its regular meeting on Monday, November 4, with all members present. The City Engineer discussed the recent Emergency Lagoon project that has been completed. The Council approved payment to DL Barkie Construction to cover the work done to date. A final payment will be made in the spring to ensure that all work meets project specifications, and that the seeded grass emerges. There is a soft spot in the area; the contractor will make any necessary repairs or corrections needed in the spring. The City received the Community Development Block (CDBG) grant of $116,400 to cover the contractor expense. The first request for payment of $82,527.00 under the Clean Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF) was approved and received in October from the Bank of North Dakota to cover other project expenses. The Council approved the payment of bills and adopted the 2020 meeting calendar continuing with meetings on the first Monday of each month at 5 p.m. except for September due to the Labor Day Holiday. The next Council meeting will be Monday, December 2.

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The Rooster Crows – November 16, 2018

By Bill Anderson

Mother Nature has been supplying all of the cold, snow, wind and ice we ever wanted, and more. Tuesday, November 13, registered the lowest temperature of the season, so far, at -1, but that won’t even register on the discomfort scale in a few weeks. Right now, here in Sargent County, we have a bin-busting soybean crop and the most bountiful corn crop in history in the process of being harvested. From cold to corn, we have everything in abundance in North Dakota. You sure can’t beat that!

Roger Pearson and Mac Pherson report that the siege of cold weather has put ice on all of the local lakes and sloughs which had been producing fish a few weeks ago, putting an end to both fishing from a boat and fishing from shore. Mac estimated that the ice on Sprague Lake could be as thick as 4 inches on Tuesday, November 13, which some ice fishing enthusiasts claim is thick enough to walk on. Mac, however, is a little more cautious, preferring at least 6 inches of ice before he ventures out. Roger has no illusions at all about his ability to walk on water, even if it is frozen, and prefers to wait for warm weather and open water, so he can catch his fish while both feet are firmly planted on dry land.

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The Rooster Crows – November 9, 2018

By Bill Anderson

Snow, wind & cold, those dreaded 4 letter words, hit with certainty on the evening of Election Day, Tuesday, November 6, and the following morning. An inch of snow, a 19-degree temperature and a 5-degree wind chill on Wednesday morning left no doubt that Old Man Winter is well armed for the season. The cold, wet weather has again delayed completion of harvest activities for many farmers, but some are getting close to the finish line. Colin Sundquist reported that 35 acres of soybeans remained to be harvested on the Sundquist farm north of Forman as of Sunday, November 4, and Mike Walstead reported that the soybean harvest had been completed and only 100 acres of corn remained to be threshed out on his Rutland Township farm as of Tuesday, November 6. Mike stated that the 2018 yields were the best he has seen since he started farming nearly 40 years ago. He didn’t want to boast, but if someone accused him of a soybean average of over 50 and a corn average of more than 200, he would have to plead “guilty!” He only wishes that he could plead guilty to $12 beans and $5 corn, and he would gladly accept his sentence with no remorse at all.

Harvey Bergstrom reports that he and Judy were at the Clarion Hotel in Minot on Saturday, November 3, to attend a meeting and banquet sponsored by the Farm Rescue organization. Harvey had suffered a heart attack a year ago, and Farm Rescue stepped in to help get his 900 acres of soybeans planted this past Spring. During the banquet on Saturday evening, several farmers from across the State, including Harvey, spoke of the assistance they had received from Farm Rescue and of their appreciation for what the organization had done. Harvey says that it is a good organization to have by your side, if and when the need arises.

Construction workers have been making progress on The Old Parsonage renovation project at 217 First Street this past week, despite the weather. Calvin Jacobson had his excavator at work and got the foundation and basement excavated, removing more than 600 cubic yards of dirt, clay and rocks. No buried evangelists, dinosaur bones or treasure chests have been discovered, at least none that Calvin is talking about. Strege Construction of Wyndmere had the footing Forms set on Friday, November 2 and the footings were poured on Monday, November 5. The next step is to install plumbing and in-floor heating prior to pouring the basement floor, and then the basement walls will be poured. It is estimated that the old house will be moved onto the new foundation within a week after the basement walls have been installed. After that, it will be a winter project for Buskohl Construction.

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The Rooster Crows – November 2, 2018

By Bill Anderson

For those who are old enough to remember Al Capp’s “Li’l Abner” comic strip, today, Friday, November 2, is Sadie Hawkin’s Day, the one day in the year when it was permissible, at least in Li’l Abner’s home community of Dogpatch, for a spinster lady to run down and capture any bachelor she could lay her hands on and drag the hapless creature to the Finish Line where Marryin’ Sam, the local preacher, would pronounce them man and wife.  Times and customs have changed, but in this year, 2018, the national equivalent of Sadie Hawkin’s Day is Election Day, when it is not only legal, but encouraged, for any candidate to run down citizens and drag them to the polls to perform their patriotic duty. Thankfully, unlike Marryin’s Sam’s pronouncements of life sentences in Dogpatch, commitments made in a polling place or voting booth, like the promises of the candidates, are short term, for no more than 2, 4 or 6 years. Some of the promises don’t even make it past the vote counting.  Well, the election campaign of 2018 will be over when the polls close on the evening of Tuesday, November 6, and the election campaign of 2020 will begin at the same instant. In Sargent County, citizens have the ability to end the pursuit by utilizing Vote By Mail to mark their ballots at home and mailing them in to be counted; by voting early, prior to election day, at the Sargent County Courthouse in Forman; and, by casting their ballot on Election Day at the County’s centralized polling place at the Sargent County Courthouse in Forman. In Dogpatch, Li’l Abner’s mother, Mammy Yokum, was the undisputed boss, the power who settled disputes, righted wrongs and imposed order. When Mammy Yokum made her decision and laid down the law she concluded her pronouncement with, “I has spoken!” Every voter who casts their ballot in this election is entitled to quote Mammy Yokum, and there will be another chance to make a pronouncement in only 2 more years.

Rainfall has been scarce during the past week, but cool mornings and heavy dews have been no friends to those trying to harvest the 2018 soybean and corn crops. Thunder and lightning rolled through the area at about 6:30 in the evening on Saturday, October 27, and left behind just enough of a sprinkle to make the combines growl as they chewed through the soybean fields. Paul Anderson’s electronic rain gauge recorded.15 of an inch of precipitation on Sunday morning. The rain gauges of Norbert Kulzer and Roger Pearson have been retired for the season and will record exactly the same amount every morning from now until next Spring. Although most local producers are still concentrating on the soybean harvest, some corn has also been combined, and reports of both yield and quality indicate an excellent crop.

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Honoring Local Veterans

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On Friday, November 11, the American Legion Auxiliary held its annual soup and supper meal for the Rutland area Veterans and their spouses.   Auxiliary members provided a fine selection of soups, sandwiches and desserts.  Following the meal the Auxiliary provided a short program including readings, stories and information of the Pocket Flag program.  Following the meal and Auxiliary program, attending Veteran’s provided stories of humorous events during their boot camp or service years.

The Rooster Crows – November 21, 2008

By Bill Anderson

November, 2008, is living up to the 11th month’s reputation as the gloomiest month of the year. The first 3 weeks have seen only sporadic sunshine, long stretches of gray, overcast skies, fog, mist and snow. The excessive rain of October has ceased, but there has not been much drying going on since then, either. The whitetail deer season opened on November 7th, with rain and snow flurries in southeastern North Dakota, but a real knock-down drag-out blizzard hammered the rest of the State, stranding many would be deer hunters at home with nothing to do but tell each other stories about epic hunting experiences of years gone by. Standing corn still affords a lot of cover for deer in this area, and, although there have been steady reports of deer being harvested, there was no rush of success during the opening weekend as in many previous seasons. As the corn harvest progresses, both whitetail deer and ringneck pheasant hunters are finding it a little easier to spot and stalk their quarry. That still doesn’t solve the problem of being able to hit what they shoot at, but that’s another story. Just ask Kaia Thorfinnson, who took 6 shots at a standing doe, only to see the animal calmly flick its tail and stroll away when the shooting subsided. Kaia redeemed her reputation as a sharpshooter on Sunday, Nov. 16, though, when she dropped a nice whitetail with 1 shot, through the heart, at about 100 yards using a Remington model 700 BDL 6mm rifle equipped with a Nikon 3X9 variable scope. Now Kaia has 2 stories to tell about the 2008 hunting season: one about the one that got away; and, one about the one that didn’t.

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Flags Retired With Honor

The Bergman/Evenson Post 215 held the Flag Retirement Ceremony on Veteran’s Day afternoon behind the Legion Hall in Rutland.  Approximately 50 faded, tattered flags that have flown over the graves of veterans, or flown by homeowners or businesses were retired with dignity and honor.  A prayer was given by Post Chaplain Milton McLaen, and Post Commander Larry Christensen presided over the retirement ceremony as each flag was placed on a fire in accordance with proper flag disposal.  I was moved as I watched each flag being consumed by the flames, and as I remembered all the men and women who have so courageously served under our nation’s flag.

After the ceremony, the veterans were served a soup and sandwich supper by the Legion Auxiliary.  The Nordland Lutheran Church parish hall was festively decorated with lace-draped tables, flags and thank you cards for our veterans and their guests.  Six kinds of soup, three kinds of sandwiches and a variety of bars ensured that no one left hungry.  Sonja Christensen, Auxiliary President, gave a reading on the birth of the Pledge of Allegiance in 1892 and the changes that have been made to it through the years.  I don’t know that I had ever given much thought as to how the Pledge of Allegiance came to be.  Sonja did a good job of enlightening us all.

Earlier Tuesday morning my husband had participated in a county-wide Veterans Day Program in Forman with two other members of the Rutland Post.  The Auxiliary in Forman served them a nice lunch of hot chile.

That evening, my husband and I agreed that it had been a good day.  We had spent Veteran’s Day remembering veterans and what they have sacrificed for our country.  That’s what the day is all about. [Carolyn Christensen]