A Piece of Rutland History

October has been pegged as family history month and Rutland has a lot of family history. There were/are the Narums and Prindivilles, Jacobsons and Christensens, Andersons, Silseths, Sundlies, Dystes, Nelsons, Hoflens, and many more. Doing any family history can be challenging and finding little known or hidden gems can be a wonderful thing.  For those whose roots are in Rutland, I happened across a little gem while looking through Village of Rutland Ordinance books.  I was reading the first four Ordinances from 1908 which, coincidentally, were only four pages long.  The half-inch thick book is mostly blank pages until near the end where there are some family history treasures.  These little gems have been hidden away for a long time and here is what that marvelous little book holds.

Rutland Village Births
Rutland Village Births

1911 – 1912 births in the Village of Rutland.  This single page lists the seven 1911 newest members of the Rutland residents and four of the 1912 births.  Names include Anton Carlson, John Jensen, C.W. Barger, A.M. Christianson and other names familiar to some.

Flados, Rosvold, Johnson

Flados, Rosvold, Johnson

People come and people go and Rutland is no different.  There are some Certificates of Death for 1918 in the book as well.  The first death entry is for Martha Gurine Erickson Flados Rosvold on April 29, 1918. Two others are also included: Bert L. Johnson and Marianne Jenson.

Nadeau Smith Child
Ord Bk Birth Flados Barger
Flados and Barger
Ord Bk Birth Eckstrom Lien Swanson
Eckstrom Lien and Swanson
Nundahl
Nundahl

The last two pages include names of seven children born in Rutland in 1918.  The wonderful part of all these entries is that they include not only the child’s name and date of birth, but also the full names of parents (mother’s maiden name) and their place of birth. That mother’s maiden name can often be a block in a family tree.

I hope you enjoy this brief trip down memory lane and I also hope that this helps solve some of those road blocks in your family tree.

The Old Parsonage

This Thursday, Rutland’s newest venture — The Old Parsonage, LLC —  has a ‘soft opening’ from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.  Kathleen Brakke, Sue Anderson, and MaryAnn Thornberg, have been busy for several months sprucing up the old Baptist Church parsonage at 217 -1st Street. Remodeling inside and out has been extensive and the project is truly an outstanding asset to the community. A new porch, roofing and siding has rejuvenated the building for its new purpose.  The store features home decor, unique gifts, furniture, repurposed treasures, antiques & collectibles.  If you know the quality of materials that the three entrepreneurs create, you know there will be an abundance of unique and creative items to choose from.

Starting tomorrow, The Old Parsonage will be open the second weekend of each month with hours Thursday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sunday, Noon to 3:00 p.m. and other times by appointment.   Come and explore the new store and then venture over to the Rutland General Store for a light snack, coffee or dinner.

The Parsonage is also seeking photographs of individuals who were married in the old Baptist Parsonage so please let Kathleen or Susan know if you have a photo to contribute. Feel free to leave a comment and they will get your information!

The Battery

The BatteryLeif Sundlie and Arthur “Rusty” Silseth were in town on Memorial Day, 2010, in Rutland.   Leif & Rusty were the principal pitcher and catcher, the battery, on the Rutland Roosters Baseball teams that dominated baseball in this area in the years following World War II.  The picture was taken by Leif’s son, Robert Sundlie of Troy, Ohio.  Leif has been inducted into the North Dakota Amateur Baseball Hall of Fame for his pitching prowess.  He set a record for strikeouts in a single North Dakota State Tournament game, 22, during one of the Roosters’ many appearances in the State’s baseball classic, but that is only one of his many achievements on the diamond.  Leif and Rusty worked very well together, and Rusty gave opposing batters the jitters with his constant stream of razzing chatter behind the plate, setting them up for a called strike or a missed swing as Leif worked his magic with the ball.  Those were the days, when “Take Me Out To The Ballpark” was almost as much the national anthem as “The Star Spangled Banner.” [This trip down memory lane is courtesy of Bill Anderson]

The Rooster Crows – March 26, 2010

By Bill Anderson

Spring has sprung! The northward migrating snow and blue geese, which had been down in Nebraska only a week earlier, arrived here in huge numbers by Thursday and Friday of last week, their noisy, squawking flights over town nearly drowning out the rattle of diesel powered pickup engines on Rutland’s Main Street. The Spring conservation hunting season on these birds has been open for a month, and some shooting near town was heard last weekend. No reports of hunter success have been received as of this writing, though. These geese may be bird-brains, but they are not totally devoid of sense. By the time they arrive at this point in their Spring migration, they have already been shot at for 1,500 miles, and have become quite adept at avoiding their ground bound pursuers. The successful hunter, even in a season in which there are hundreds of thousands of geese and there is no legal limit on the number that may be taken, must be at least as wily as a goose, and an embarrassing number find that they have difficulty crossing that intellectual threshold. The Spring conservation hunt of snow and blue geese is held in an attempt to keep the prolific birds from over-populating, over-grazing and destroying their summer range in northern Canada. The huge populations of snow and blue geese, as well as of other waterfowl, including their cousins, the magnificent giant Canada geese, are the products of conservation efforts begun more than a century ago, during the Presidency of Theodore Roosevelt, himself an avid hunter and outdoors enthusiast. The efforts have been so successful that some species, once thought to be headed for extinction, are now so numerous as to be regarded as pests in many areas. Well, it is the hunter’s good fortune. When it comes to fishing, waterfowl hunting, upland game hunting or big game hunting in southeastern North Dakota, the “good old days” are right now.

Friday, March 19, was the day for the Grand Opening at the remodeled and renovated Rutland Café. The Rutland General Store, owned and managed by Gretchen Vann, acquired the Café from Shari Leinen back in mid-October, and spent the next 3½ months in a make-over of the facility that was originally built and equipped in 1948. Carpenter John Buskohl of Milnor did most of the remodeling work, while Calvin Jacobson and crew of Jacobson Plumbing, Heating and Excavating of Rutland took care of their specialties and Harvey Kleingarn of B&K Electric of Forman re-wired the business. At 10:00 on Friday morning, Shirley Mahrer cut the ribbon opening the corridor between the General Store and the Café, after brief remarks by owner Vann. Mrs. Mahrer’s late husband, Bernard Mahrer, was the original builder, owner and operator of the Café, 62 years ago. Other operators and owners, including: Bernard’s parents, Frank & Minnie Mahrer; Harry & Martha Christensen; Henry & Mabel Hare; David & Adeline Brakke; Edna Anderson & Lois Nelson on behalf of the Rutland Commercial Club; Ralph & Lois Nelson; Sue Nathe; and, Shari Leinen were also recognized and honored during the ceremony. A number of prizes were awarded in drawings held throughout the day, including a Grand Prize of an “Auto-Start”, with installation, contributed by Dick Nelson Sales & Leasing of Valley City. Dick’s parents, Ralph & Lois Nelson, owned and operated the Café for 36 years, from 1962 through 1998. The Grand Prize was won by Ella Lou Nelson of Rutland. The Rutland community is fortunate to have such a fine commercial facility on its Main Street, and extends congratulations to the owner and employees on a job well done.

Continue reading “The Rooster Crows – March 26, 2010”

Rutland Residents at Inauguration Events

Rutland residents Bill Anderson and Pam Gulleson were among the thousands who attended the Inauguration ceremonies in Washington, D.C., in January.  Accompanying them were Lowell Wyum of Forman and Lance Gulleson of Lisbon.  They have provided several photos from the inauguration events and photos taken at the Vietnam War Memorial Wall in which Bill Anderson is pointing at some names.  Bill sends along this information:  “Larry Dyer and Larry Greene served with me in the US Marine infantry platoon I commanded in Vietnam, and were killed in action on February 4, 1970, brother Paul’s 21st birthday and a day I will never forget.  They were both only 19 years old.  Cleo Levang was from Forman and graduated from Sargent Central High School in 1964.  He was in the Marines, too, and was killed in action on January 5, 1967.  He was only 20 years old.  I thought that our national leaders had learned the lessons of Vietnam, but Iraq showed us that you are not likely to learn the lessons if you never showed up for the class.  Anyway, we had a great time in Washington.  It was a  trip of a lifetime and I am really glad that I went.  There were millions of happy, hopeful, positive and optimistic Americans there on Inauguration Day, very pleased that a dark chapter in American history was coming to a close and that a new day was dawning for the American people, and the people of the world.  Well, that’s enough preaching.”